Tag Archives: South32

K2fly gets to work on RCubed mineral inventory reporting solution for South32

K2fly has signed up diversified mining and metals company, South32, to use its resource governance solution, RCubed.

South32 is expected to use the platform for its mineral inventory reporting for five years, with the total contract value more than A$880,000 ($608,419), K2fly said.

The full implementation is to commence immediately and will cover 19 global operations, the company added.

Nic Pollock, K2fly’s Chief Commercial Officer, said: “It is a great honour to be working with South32. This adds to our growing list of diversified customers like Rio Tinto, Teck Resources and Nexa Resources.”

The company says its total contract value has growth 45% this quarter and is now over A$6.9 million, compared with the end of the March quarter.

Alliance stays in the air with South32 Cannington, GEMCO contract

Alliance Aviation Services says it has entered a new airline services contract with South32, as agent for each of its Cannington and GEMCO routes.

Alliance will be the sole supplier for these services, according to the company, continuing a relationship with the mine sites that began in 2006.

The extension, from 2020-2030, was won through a competitive tender process and is testament to Alliance’s safety record, on time performance and competitiveness in the marketplace, according to the ASX-listed service provider.

Lee Schofield, Alliance’s CEO, said: “Alliance is delighted to be continuing the provision of these services for both Cannington and GEMCO mine sites from Townsville, Cairns and Brisbane. This new contract will see Alliance flying a minimum of 35 sectors per week.

“For the next 10 years Alliance will also be servicing South32’s charter requirements from Darwin. This will result in a significant increase in our permanent presence in the Northern Territory, which in turn should provide significant new opportunities for Alliance, particularly in tourism.”

GEMCO, in the Northern Territory of Australia, is an open-cut mining operation, producing high-grade manganese ore that is shipped to South32’s Tasmania manganese alloy plant and around the world.

The Cannington underground silver-lead mine, in Queensland, is made up of a 3 Mt/y underground mine and processing plant (pictured).

Miners not taking cybersecurity risks seriously, report finds

While cybersecurity is today considered a major threat to all industrial companies, a recent report out of Australia has concluded it will take a catastrophic event for it to be taken seriously in the mining industry.

Through interviews, survey and analysis of Australia’s largest mining and service companies, including BHP, Rio Tinto, South32, and Anglo American, the ‘State of Play: Cyber Security Report’, from researchers at State of Play, has uncovered that 98% of top-level executives think a catastrophic event is required to drive an industry response to cybersecurity in mining.

This is despite State of Play Chairman and Co-founder, Graeme Stanway, saying the risk of cybersecurity failures in mining could be severe.

“In an increasingly automated and interconnected world, the risk of rogue systems and equipment is growing rapidly,” he says.

“If someone hacks into a mining system, they can potentially take remote control of operational equipment. That’s the level of risk that we are facing.”

Global Head of Cybersecurity at BHP, Thomas Leen, agreed and said the mining industry is up against archaic processes when it comes to evolving on the cybersecurity front.

“Mining as an industry has a low level of cybersecurity maturity, mainly due to legacy environments that lack basic capabilities,” he says.

The report went on to find that the second most likely driver to instigate change, after a catastrophic event, will be government led initiatives and responses.

Michelle Price, CEO of independent, not-for-profit organisation, AustCyber, believes public-private partnership is the key to driving change in the way the mining industry approaches cybersecurity.

“AustCyber has collaborated with METS Ignited and State of Play to conduct this survey as we see the potential to improve cybersecurity across the mining environment,” she says.

“There are several challenges specific to the mining sector as documented in the Australian Cyber Security Industry Roadmap, developed in conjunction with CSIRO – such as operational technology, connected equipment and sensors, availability of data, anomaly detection and the volatility of markets.

“There are plenty of growth opportunities – especially when the sector collaborates with organisations like AustCyber to have a coordinated voice on the kind of support it needs to push forward cyber resilience.”

South32 Head of Cybersecurity, Clayton Brazil, sees this collaboration as a strength of cybersecurity in the mining industry. “Cybersecurity is incredibly collaborative in mining, we know it’s a critical industry for our nation and we all want to be safer,” he says.

Brazil sees a strong cybersecurity capability as a strategic opportunity for South32. “Done properly, cybersecurity can be a competitive advantage for us,” he said.

Interestingly, when asked what is the most likely motivation for cyber attacks, 50% of responses identified extortion and theft as the most likely cause, followed by competition with 21% and politics with 19%.

METS Ignited CEO, Adrian Beer, says industry growth and sustainability will come from collaboration and the implementation of standards. “Mining operations are still made up of legacy closed systems that have customised integrations between them,” he says.

“However, the modern technology vendor community is trying to overcome these systems with new models; building collaboration and trust between mining and the technology sector will create a secure sustainable future.”

Beer also believes standards have a two-prong role to play. “There is clearly a need for both a strong set of standards to define what good looks like in terms of cybersecurity more broadly, and a set of industry standards to ensure that the specific needs are met to deliver those secure outcomes.”

Telstra lays the groundwork for major underground LTE network at Cannington mine

Telstra Mining Services has announced a new partnership with South32 for a private 4G LTE network at its Cannington underground silver-lead-zinc mine in northwest Queensland, Australia.

Telstra is now in the pre-deployment stage at Cannington, with the network set to “drive improved safety, automation and mechanisation” at the site and connect staff to vehicles and sensors around the mine at all times, it said.

The underground mine produces about 3 Mt/y and the Cannington team is made up of about 550 full-time employees and up to 300 contractors.

Jeannette McGill, Head of Telstra Mining Services, said: “The high throughput and low latency offered by the system means that staff will be able to control critical equipment without interruption, and South32’s digitalisation strategy will be achievable throughout the mine.”

By adopting 4G LTE underground, the Cannington mine will be able to achieve better operating transparency, condition monitoring and production improvements for staff, machines and other mining systems, driving safety, productivity and efficiency, she added.

Telstra will be building an initial underground network 6.5 km in length using a “private, virtualised core” and LTE radio technologies distributed over leaky feeder cable using LTE-capable bi-directional amplifiers.

McGill said: “Our analysis indicates this to be the most effective solution for underground miners and is capable of adapting to the unique geology and composition of the Cannington mine. It enables access to the latest advances in 4G LTE and NB-IoT, and is also upgradeable to 5G in the future.”

The network being private means it will be a completely standalone mobile network, independent from others, like Telstra’s own public network, she explained. “South32 Cannington will have its own equipment, SIM cards and unique network codes for full autonomy and complete control.”

Providing a modern connectivity platform will allow for more flexible operations as well as scalability and choice in applying various digital solutions, according to Telstra.

“The combination of Ericsson mobile network equipment, Telstra radio spectrum, and leaky feeder solutions from specialist manufacturer METStech provides a unique capability that has made extending LTE underground a more commercially realistic and safer prospect,” McGill explained.

At its full deployment, the Cannington installation will become one of the largest underground mining LTE networks in the world using leaky feeder, according to Telstra.

“We’re excited to help drive South32’s Cannington mine further with this new private network, as it looks to pay dividends to safety, productivity and more,” McGill concluded.

South32 address Illawarra road safety with Linfox Logistics deal

South32’s Illawarra Metallurgical Coal says it has contracted Linfox Logistics in a new six-year partnership that will improve road safety in the Illawarra of New South Wales, Australia.

In what South32 says is an Australian first, Linfox has custom-built the innovative “Lin-Double” truck to address the unique challenges of coal haulage in the region. The partnership will see 25 of these new trucks join the company’s fleet.

When in full use, the “Lin-Double” will reduce truck movements on public roads by almost 40,000 trips per year, according to South32, significantly improving local traffic flow and reducing the burden on public roads.

“The trucks feature industry-leading technology including crawler transmission and a speed limiter with GPS monitoring to safely navigate the steep descent down Mount Ousley [Road] while greatly reducing the risk of brake fade to increase driver and public safety,” South32 said.

Illawarra Metallurgical Coal has underground mines at Appin and Dendrobium producing high-quality metallurgical coal used for steelmaking. As a by-product, it also supplies small amounts of coal for energy. All of this is processed at its plants at West Cliff and Dendrobium, before being transported by road and rail down to Port Kembla in Wollongong.

Illawarra Metallurgical Coal, General Manager Mining Services, Andy Hyslop, said the investment was a demonstration of South32’s commitment to safety and innovation and would deliver benefits for both the community and the company.

“We are proud to be bringing safer trucks to the Illawarra while reducing the number of trucks on the road by around 20% every year,” he said.

The company concluded: “South32 values the communities that support its operations, and with state-of-the-art trucks and improved driver training and management systems, this partnership will contribute to the region’s sustainability and liveability for years to come.”

 

Marthinusen & Coutts speeds up generator overhaul for South32 manganese plant

Marthinusen & Coutts, a division of ACTOM, says it has successfully completed a major overhaul on a 70 MVA generator set at South32’s Metalloys manganese plant, in South Africa, within six weeks.

The company, which worked in collaboration with business unit ACTOM Turbo Machines, was contracted by South32 to take full responsibility for the entire drive train refurbishment, it said.

According to Mike Chamberlain, Marthinusen & Coutts’ Marketing Executive, this achievement showcased the capacity of the divisions to take full control of large mechanical and electrical refurbishments. Chamberlain highlighted that the customer did not want to split the responsibility for the complete generator and turbine drive train between separate contractors.

“Marthinusen & Coutts and ACTOM Turbo Machines’ capabilities enable us to control the entire process, offering peace of mind to customers, coupled with optimised cost efficiencies,” Chamberlain said. “This also reduces customers’ risk and managerial effort in dealing with multiple suppliers.”

The scope included a complete inspection of the turbine rotor and internal components, as well as runout and dimensional inspection on the rotor. Inspections incorporated glass bead blasting and non-destructive testing of many components.

High-speed balancing of the 13 t rotor was conducted, and turbine rotor journals were repaired, according to the company. White metal bearings were relined, and the thrust bearing was modified to improve fitment in the bearing casing. Additionally, positive material identification tests were conducted on all the studs, nuts and shaft seals. A complete 3D scan was done of the centreline to allow reverse engineering drawings.

At is repair facility in Cleveland, Johannesburg, Marthinusen & Coutts also performed a number of inspections, tests and repairs on the rotor. Dimensional inspections and electrical tests were conducted, as well as non-destructive testing such as the phase array test. Slip rings were ground, the diode wheel was inspected, and the diodes were tested.

ACTOM Turbo Machines inspected and refurbished the auxiliary mechanical equipment. This included lubrication and control oil systems, pumps, coolers, and white metal bearings on ID and FD fans. ACTOM Turbo Machines Project Manager, Hannes de Jager, noted that an overhaul of this magnitude and scope would usually take over two months.

“The excellent working relationship we had with Metalloys’ technical staff, and the cooperation we got from them, certainly contributed to completing the work as quickly as we did,” de Jager said.

Starting the inspections, tests and repairs in July 2018, the team completed the overhaul by mid-August.

SRG Global wins service contract at South32’s Worsley alumina operation

Construction, maintenance and mining service group, SRG Global says it has secured a long-term contract with South32’s Worsley Alumina subsidiary in Australia.

The ASX-listed service provider will deliver a “complete suite” of engineered access solutions for the Worsley alumina operation, including scaffold services and highly skilled rope access technicians, it said.

The contract is for an initial three-year term with extension options for a further three years, SRG said, explaining that, if Worsley Alumina exercises the extension options, the total contract duration will be six years.

Works under this contract commence in June and are expected to generate revenues of circa-A$60 million ($41 million) over the six-year term or around $32 million over the initial three-year term, according to SRG.

“The contract requires minimal capital outlay and will increase SRG Global’s workforce by circa-100 full-time positions,” SRG said.

SRG Global Managing Director, David Macgeorge, said, “The opportunity to work with a world-renowned mining company like South32 at its long-established Worsley Alumina project in South West WA is a great achievement for SRG Global. The effort our team put in during the competitive tendering process is admirable and I commend them on a fantastic result.

“This contract also represents a significant advancement in the group’s long-term strategy to deliver recurring term revenue within the asset services sector.”

As part of the Worsley Alumina operations, bauxite is mined near the town of Boddington, 130 km southeast of Perth, Western Australia. It is then transported on the largest overland conveyor belt in the southern hemisphere, for more than 50 km, to a refinery near the town of Collie, where bauxite is turned into alumina.

South32 powers up Cannington solar PV farm

The new 7,200-panel solar farm at South32’s Cannington silver-lead mine in northwest Queensland, Australia, is up and running, the mining company confirmed.

The 6 ha, 3 MW installation is the company’s first solar installation and will help to deliver reduced greenhouse gas emissions by offsetting gas consumption with solar. Construction commenced in May.

“Electricity generated from the farm will be used to supply the operation’s accommodation village and airport with surplus power used to support mining and processing operations,” South32 said.

The project – which contributes to the objectives of the company’s Climate Change Strategy – is the second largest solar installation in a remote, off-grid mining operation in Australia and the first to be integrated into a gas-fired power station, according to the company.

Earlier this year, EDL Energy signed a 14-year extension of its contract to supply electricity for Cannington, which included partnering with SunSHIFT, a wholly-owned subsidiary of engineering and construction firm Laing O’Rourke, to ‘hybridise’ the existing 34 MW gas plant at the site, with this 3 MW solar photovoltaic installation.

It is anticipated the new solar farm will prevent between 4,000-6,000 t/y of greenhouse gas emissions.

Rob Jackson, Vice President Operations at Cannington, said the operation was committed to identifying energy efficiency initiatives. “Reducing greenhouse gas emissions is a big part of that so I’m delighted that our Cannington operation’s solar installation is leading the way,” he said.

The cost to install and operate the solar farm will be offset by lower fuel costs, according to South32. This makes it an economically viable solution for the operation.

De.mem to clean up at South32’s Cannington silver-lead mine

Water and waste water treatment company De.mem has unveiled A$350,000 ($252,364) in new orders from municipal and resource sector customers, including one from South32’s Cannington silver-lead operation in Queensland, Australia.

The sale to South32 is for a membrane-based water treatment system supplied by the company’s wholly-owned Akwa-Worx subsidiary.

Akwa-Worx designs, builds and delivers a wide range of water and waste water treatment systems that make use of modern membrane technologies. Depending on the contaminants to be removed, and the product water quality desired, these systems may use ultrafiltration, nanofiltration or reverse osmosis membranes, plus there is also a membrane bioreactor option.

Cannington has been in production for 20 years and now produces 7% of the world’s lead and 6% of the world’s silver, according to the company.

Mastermyne back on the road at South32’s Illawarra coal complex

Australia and coal focused Mastermyne Group has been given the nod by South32 to restart roadway development services at the Illawarra coal complex in New South Wales.

The contract, initially awarded back in August 2017, is expected to deliver annual revenues of some $18 million, according to Mastermyne.

South32 requested roadway development be stopped in line with the temporary closure of the Appin mine, part of the Illawarra complex, last year.

Mastermyne said the additional revenue generated through this contract secures the upper end of the 2019 financial year (to end-June 2019) guidance range of A$230-250 million ($165-179 million).

Mastermyne CEO Tony Caruso said: “We are very pleased to have recommenced work on this project and further extend out working relationship with South32’s Illawarra metallurgical coal operations.”

The company already has a contract in place with South32 for the provision of services at the Appin mine. This is primarily process works and supplementary labour in the Appin longwall area.