Tag Archives: Mammoet

Mammoet delivers the goods at BHP’s South Flank iron ore mine

Mammoet has helped BHP deliver on its goals for the South Flank iron ore project in the Pilbara of Western Australia, using its expertise to transport over 1,000 oversized items to site safely and on time.

These components needed to be transported to site safely, on schedule and in the right sequence. With a cumulative weight in excess of 29,500 t, they needed to be transported 340 km across the state’s barren interior. This had to be done within a demanding timeframe to keep the construction schedule on track, according to Mammoet, a feat achieved and confirmed with the first ore milestone at South Flank in May of this year.

The cargo would be taken from the ship’s hook at Port Hedland and across a route largely consisting of public highways. Transporting these modules in the largest possible pieces would reduce the time spent integrating them on site – but the maximum transport size is always limited by the width and condition of the route, Mammoet says.

The possibilities for what could be transported on this stretch of tarmac were pushed to new limits as Mammoet delivered a 349 t module comprising the train load out bin gate and HPU module. This was the heaviest load ever carried along this stretch of Western Australia’s Great Northern Highway.

Restrictions were also placed on when modules could be transported, which varied depending on their size: those wider than 8.5 m needed to travel at night, so that the transport had the lowest economic impact on the surrounding community and public road users. A rolling roadblock was set up to shut down the highway in sections, minimising the transport’s impact further still.

To achieve this required logistics planning and early engagement with the project’s construction contractors to identify precisely what could be transported and how.

Pete O’Connell, Senior Project Manager at Mammoet, explains: “Engagement at the planning stage with engineering, procurement and construction contractors can help to optimise how our package of work integrates with other workflows. It was particularly critical in this case – given the size and volume of components that needed to be on site in a specific order and timeframe for construction to proceed smoothly.

“We were able to advise the modularisation engineers on how to get maximum benefit from the load sizes possible on the route, in terms of their overall dimensions and the maximum weights to cross structures such as bridges. We were then able to plan from the very start the equipment and expertise we would need to best carry out the work.”

Mammoet used a specially-built trailer type to minimise the weight of the transport equipment itself and, therefore, increase the size of module that could be carried. Overall weight limitations on Australian highways meant a lighter alternative to the traditionally used four-file platform trailer was needed to avoid reducing the size of the modules themselves.

Smaller module sizes, of course, mean more transportation – and, in turn, additional transport and integration costs. Mammoet’s equipment inventory was put to good use in devising a three-file trailer solution. This allowed the desired size of module to be transported within local regulations.

Delivery of such a large scale of transport work was already a significant challenge within the planned 15-month timescale, but, due to delays earlier in the project schedule, this cargo needed to be transported in a shorter timeframe, according to Mammoet.

Despite ongoing travel restrictions due to COVID-19, Mammoet was able to mobilise a team of over 90 people – half of whom came from outside the state or abroad. Before long, crews were working across day and night shifts at Port Hedland, keeping things on schedule.

Another important part of this solution was to increase the number of trailers being used, avoiding the need for them to be reconfigured between journeys, hence achieving a faster turnaround. With the industry’s biggest equipment fleet, Mammoet says it was able to redeploy trailers from across Australia and the wider region.

O’Connell continues: “Flexibility is always key in large projects such as this, as changes in project schedules are to be expected. As the largest supplier in our industry, the talent pool, training capabilities and equipment inventory that we have access to prove invaluable in making sure we can react quickly and adapt to client requirements – avoiding delays even if there is a change to the plan.”

A key development in driving economic growth for the Pilbara region and the State of Western Australia, BHP’s $3.6 billion South Flank mine has created more than 2,500 construction jobs and 600 ongoing operational roles. It is set to provide a profitable asset for BHP and secure employment for the Pilbara population for decades to come, Mammoet says.

Wouter Mink, Managing Director of Mammoet Australia, says: “We are delighted that South Flank delivered first ore during May 2021. This project helps to continue our commitment to the Pilbara region. The transport package was always going to play a key role in achieving this, and we were extremely pleased to have delivered this successfully despite the challenges we faced – including a global pandemic impacting on how, when and where we could source our team.”

Construction of this facility using modern modularised techniques was aided significantly by Mammoet’s expertise in getting over 1,000 oversized items to site safely and on time, and also by providing critical guidance to optimise the size of cargo and ensure the most efficient project.

Heath Tyler, BHP South Flank Area Project Manager, says: “The South Flank project represents a major investment by BHP and a key element in our strategy for the region. With the transport package playing such a critical part in achieving a successful build, we needed a partner that had the proven expertise, equipment and boots on the ground to deliver. Mammoet has proven a great fit for these criteria.”

Kenmare, Mammoet begin WCP B relocation at Moma mineral sands mine

Kenmare Resources says the relocation of Wet Concentrator Plant (WCP) B at its Moma titanium minerals mine, in northern Mozambique, is underway.

Kenmare previously announced three development projects that together have the objective of increasing annual ilmenite production to 1.2 Mt (plus co-products) on a sustainable basis from 2021, with the move of WCP B to the high grade Pilivili ore zone is the final project.

The increased production is expected to significantly lower cash operating costs to between $125-$135/t (in 2020 real terms). Consequently, from 2021 the group expects to be positioned in the first quartile of the industry revenue to cost (or margin) curve, supporting stronger free cash flow generation and providing for increased shareholder returns, it said.

WCP B, consisting of a 1,700 t floating dredge and a 7,000 t WCP, is being moved 23 km from its previous mining area at Namalope to a new high-grade ore zone called Pilivili. It is being transported along a purpose-built road using platform vehicles called self-propelled modular transporters (SPMTs). The relocation of WCP B and its dredge are being undertaken by Mammoet.

Mining at Namalope completed in late August. The WCP and its associated dredge have now been successfully placed on the concrete plinths in the relocation pond and the pond has been dewatered. The dredge and the WCP are to be moved in two stages. The first stage involves the movement of the dredge – this is now underway and expected to be completed this week. Once the dredge has been relocated to Pilivili, the SPMTs will return to Namalope to transport the WCP along the same route. The physical relocation is expected to be completed in the next few weeks.

Michael Carvill, Managing Director of Kenmare, said: “The relocation of WCP B and its dredge form the third and final project of our development program to increase Moma’s ilmenite production to 1.2 Mt per annum on a sustainable basis. Once WCP B and the dredge reach Pilivili we will begin the process of re-establishing them in their new location and we expect mining to commence at Pilivili during Q4 (December quarter) 2020. I look forward to providing further updates as the project progresses.”

Mammoet completes ALE acquisition

Mammoet has completed the acquisition of ALE, just over four months since the two heavy logistics companies agreed on the deal.

The businesses will now operate as one company under the Mammoet brand and, over the coming months, a fully developed integration plan will be rolled out that will focus on bringing the two organisations together, while maintaining safe and world-class service levels to our customers, Mammoet says.

According to Mammoet, the global coverage of the combined business covers over 140 offices and branches worldwide. Both companies specialise in engineered heavy lifting and transport for sectors such as the petrochemical industry, renewable energy, power generation, civil construction and the offshore industry.

Paul van Gelder, Mammoet CEO, said: “We are looking forward to working together with our new colleagues all over the world and establishing long-term relationships with our customers, existing and new. We will put all our efforts into supporting them with their activities aimed at enhancing cities, businesses and communities that are all part of the transition to a more sustainable future. As their goals increase in size and complexity, we must reshape ourselves to support them while keeping our primary focus on safety.”

Mammoet’s combined team of professionals, as well as its fleet of heavy equipment, are now the world’s largest, according to the company. “This significantly enhances scalability, innovation capabilities and efficient mobilisation, like no one else in the industry.”

Mammoet says it is the only global heavy lifting and transport business with a large R&D facility run independently from its operational activities, allowing it to innovate for the long term in close collaboration with customers.

Mammoet keeps BHP South Flank iron ore project moving forward

Mammoet is doing its bit to ensure BHP hits its 2021 first production goal at the South Flank iron ore project, in the Pilbara of Western Australia, having started transporting the first heavy components for the under-construction mine.

Around 1,900 items including prefabricated and modular mine processing plant units of various sizes will be transported from Port Hedland to the new mine site, 340 km away, Mammoet said.

The $3.6 billion South Flank project, around 8 km south of BHP’s existing Mining Area C operation, will replace production from BHP’s Yandi mine, which is nearing the end of its life. The investment into the new mine site will ensure the continued production of high-quality iron ore for more than 25 years, according to BHP.

Once complete, South Flank will be one of Western Australia’s largest iron ore processing facilities. As mentioned, production is expected to start in 2021.

Mammoet has existing operational branches in Port Hedland and Karratha, meaning it is equipped to provide localised support for the South Flank project.

Among other heavy haulage equipment on site, Mammoet has 96 axle lines of SPMT located in the port and the mine site, as well as 178 axle lines of conventional trailers with 14 prime movers. The company says it has approached the large-scale logistics project with detailed planning to coordinate the thousands of components that are arriving at the port over 14 shipments and ensure they are delivered to site safely and on time.

Mammoet and ALE to combine heavy logistics expertise

Mammoet says it has signed an agreement to acquire ALE in a deal that will see two big players in the heavy logistics for mines market combine.

Both companies specialise in engineered heavy lifting and transport for sectors such as the petrochemical industry, renewable energy, power generation, civil construction and the offshore industry.

Paul van Gelder, CEO of Mammoet said: “We are very happy with this agreement. Mammoet and ALE complement each other in geographical presence on all continents. Together, we have a well-balanced portfolio of activities worldwide. This enables us to improve our service proposition and create synergies, as we are able to mobilise equipment and personnel swiftly anywhere. Last but not least, Mammoet and ALE both have a strong legacy in innovations which, once combined, will enable us to grow as a technologically leading player.”

One such innovation is the Mammoet Trailer Power Assist, a new engineered heavy transport solution designed to improve transport efficiency and significantly lower the carbon footprint of major projects around the world, which the company and Scheuerle, a member of the TII Group, unveiled in 2018.

Mark Harries, Group Managing Director of ALE added: “Mammoet and ALE share a strong ambition to be leading in the engineered heavy lifting and transport sector. Both companies have a strong track record and are renowned for their craftsmanship, innovations and fleet of equipment. We both have shaped the profession of heavy lifting and transport through numerous innovations in the past decades. The prospect of the two companies joining forces is very exciting.”

The closing of the transaction is subject to approval of the relevant competition authorities. Until that time, Mammoet and ALE will continue to operate strictly independently.

Kenmare pushes ahead with Wet Concentrator Plant relocation at Moma

Kenmare Resources’s board is backing a plan to relocate its Wet Concentrator Plant (WCP) B to the Pilivili ore zone at its Moma titanium minerals mine, in northern Mozambique, after a definitive feasibility study (DFS) indicated the move could deliver an additional 130,000 t/y of heavy mineral concentrate (HMC) from 2021.

The DFS, completed by Hatch Africa, confirmed the technical and economic feasibility of relocating WCP B to Pilivili, following the completion of the existing mining path at Namalope in the September quarter of 2020, Kenmare said.

The WCP B relocation is the last of three internal growth projects required to increase production to 1.2 Mt/y of ilmenite (plus co-products of zircon and rutile), according to the company.

WCP B and its dredge will be relocated by specialist heavy lifting and transport contractors on a purpose-built road from Namalope to Pilivili, according to Kenmare. The company’s updated investor presentation displayed a graphic of self-propelled modular transporters provided by Mammoet.

The key additional infrastructure required to commence production from Pilivili includes a HMC pumping system and power infrastructure, in addition to a 23 km purpose-built road.

The contractor will use self-propelled modular transporters to transport WCP B out of its mining pond at Namalope, along a road, including a causeway estuary crossing into the new mining pond at Pilivili. This is the same type of equipment that was used to transport the recently completed WCP C dredge in the Netherlands, Kenmare said.

The company posted a video of a simulated move here, which featured equipment from Mammoet.

The relocation and re-establishment of WCP B is expected to commence in the September quarter of 2020 for a period of up to 12 weeks, with the commissioning of WCP B at Pilivili anticipated in the December quarter of that year. During this 12-week period, production from WCP B is expected to be suspended.

“Additional mining areas have been identified for WCP B at Namalope to ensure that production is maintained, in the event of delays to the project execution schedule,” Kenmare said.

The Pilivili ore zone has the highest grades within Moma’s portfolio, with mineral reserves of 220 Mt averaging 4.4% total heavy mineral (THM). The life of mine average grade mined by WCP B at Pilivili is expected to be 4.6% THM and in the first four years of production the average grade mined is expected to be 5.3% THM. Due to these higher grades, production from Pilivili is expected to increase overall HMC production by an average of 130,000 t/y, contributing to a total of 1.2 Mt/y of ilmenite production (plus co-products) from 2021.

Additionally, Pilivili’s mineral reserves have higher zircon and rutile co-product credits than Namalope (with 0.25% zircon and 0.08% rutile in ore), which are expected to contribute to lower cash operating costs per tonne of ilmenite.

The total capital cost estimate for the relocation is $106 million, including $15 million contingency, which Kenmare expects to fund from its balance sheet and internally generated cash flow.

The most significant infrastructure requirement for the relocation of WCP B is the construction of the purpose-built road for the transportation of WCP B and its dredge. The road will be 23 km in length and 66 m wide, and construction is expected to take approximately eight months from the September quarter. HMC produced at Pilivili will be transported to the MSP using a 16 km overland pipeline and positive displacement pumping system. Electrical power at Pilivili will be provided by a new 16 km 110 kV power line adjacent to the purpose-built road, supported by a static synchronous compensator to improve reliability.

Kenmare received approval of the Environmental, Social and Health Impact Assessment (ESHIA) ESHIA for Pilivili from the Ministry of Land, Environment and Rural Development in Mozambique in May 2019, in line with the project delivery timeline. The company expects the ESHIA for the purpose-built road to be approved in the September quarter.

The contractor will use self-propelled modular transporters (“SPMTs”) to transport WCP B out of its mining pond at Namalope, along a purpose-built road, including a causeway estuary crossing into the new mining pond at Pilivili. This is the same method that was used to transport the recently completed WCP C dredge in the Netherlands.