Tag Archives: motors

Wajax to grow ERS and industrial parts businesses with Tundra Process buy

Wajax has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire all of the issued and outstanding shares of Calgary, Alberta-based Tundra Process Solutions in a cash and shares deal worth C$99.1 million ($78.2 million).

The transaction is expected to close early in the March quarter and is subject to customary closing conditions, Wajax said.

Founded in 1999, Tundra provides maintenance and technical services to customers in the western Canadian midstream oil and gas, oil sands, petrochemical, mining, forestry and municipal sectors. It also distributes a diverse range of industrial process equipment, representing manufacturers of valves and actuators, instrumentation and controls, motors and drives, control buildings, boilers and water treatment solutions.

Employing around 150 people, Tundra operates four facilities in Alberta: Calgary, Edmonton (two locations) and Grande Prairie. Tundra also maintains a local sales presence in Fort McMurray and Red Deer, Alberta; Vancouver and Fort St. John, British Columbia; and southern Saskatchewan.

Wajax said the acquisition of Tundra was expected to provide meaningful growth in the corporation’s Engineered Repair Services (ERS) and industrial parts categories, with its operations complementary to Wajax’s existing ERS and industrial parts businesses.

For the 12 months ended November 30, 2020, Tundra had revenues of about C$147.8 million.

Mark Foote, President and Chief Executive Officer of Wajax, said: “Tundra’s market leadership in process control provides Wajax with meaningful scale in ERS and related industrial parts in western Canada. In central and eastern Canada, Tundra’s technical capabilities and product and service range will provide new opportunities to further extend Wajax’s ERS services to our customers.

“Our complementary cultures of safety, customer service and product and service innovation translates into growth driven by a consistent vision of constantly increasing what we can do for our customers.”

Iggy Domagalski, Chief Executive Officer of Tundra, added: “Partnering with Wajax allows us to instantly grow our volumes by leveraging our combined customer relationships and branch networks. Existing Wajax customers will benefit from a broader range of valve, instrumentation and electrical products and services, and existing Tundra customers will benefit from Wajax’s extensive ERS portfolio and geographic footprint.

“We are excited to join Wajax and contribute to the goal of becoming Canada’s leading ERS provider.”

ABB to deliver drives and motors to Fortescue’s Iron Bridge Magnetite project

ABB has won a $26 million order from Fortescue Metals Group to deliver water-cooled variable speed drives and high voltage induction motors to FMG’s majority-owned Iron Bridge Magnetite project in Western Australia.

The project, operated under an unincorporated joint venture between Fortescue subsidiary, FMG Magnetite Pty Ltd, and Formosa Steel IB, covers the development of a new magnetite mine, including processing and transport facilities. The $2.6 billion development is expected to produce 22 Mt/y (wet) of high grade, magnetite concentrate, with first ore in 2022.

As part of the project, the Iron Bridge Joint Venture required a cost-effective energy efficient variable speed drive solution, according to ABB. These drives, to be installed in eight switch rooms, operate with a separate transformer that is located outside the room. This reduces the heat generated inside, resulting in less energy required to maintain the 25°C room temperature.

ABB’s water-cooled drives also directly support a higher voltage 33 kV network, it said. “This eliminates the need for a lower voltage intermediate switchboard and additional components, which ultimately reduces the total cost of the project,” the company explained.

Iron Bridge also selected ABB high voltage induction motors to power high pressure grinding rolls, grinding mills and baghouse fans used to separate the ore from the dust at Iron Bridge. Engineered to withstand harsh conditions, the motors offer high power efficiency, but in a frame size smaller than competitive alternatives, it said.

Mike Briggs, Business Manager for ABB Motion, Australia, said: “We have worked closely with the Iron Bridge team to ensure that we delivered an energy efficient, reliable and innovative solution. We are especially pleased to have won both the drive and the motor business, and look forward to continuing our strong relationship with Fortescue beyond the delivery of this project and supporting them throughout the mine’s lifecycle.”

Zest WEG signs up Panaco to grow footprint in key DRC mining hub

Zest WEG, in an effort to strengthen its Africa footprint, has appointed Panaco as its value-added reseller (VAR) in the Katanga region of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC).

According to Zest WEG’s Africa Business Development Executive, Taylor Milan, Panaco is a 100% locally-owned business that has successfully serviced the region, known for mining, for over 40 years.

“Panaco is a well-established and respected company with strong business relationships with nearly all of our current clients,” Milan said. “Its business methodology and culture are closely aligned with ours, and this synergy will aid us in supporting our current installed base, client network and growth expectations.”

Milan highlighted the increasing importance of local content in the supply of equipment and services across the continent. Therefore, Zest WEG has prioritised closer partnerships with local firms as a key element of its sustainable growth strategy in Africa, a strategy Zest WEG Group CEO, Siegfried Kreutzfeld, mentioned shortly after being appointed to the role in 2019.

Milan also emphasised the importance of VARs in this strategy.

“Going beyond the role of just a distributor, a VAR is a local business chosen to promote and support the wide range of Zest WEG’s offering,” he said. “It carries the whole Zest WEG brand into local markets.

“Panaco has the ability to assist us in growing the comprehensive WEG product portfolio well beyond our traditional low-voltage motor and drive business,” he said. “It has business facilities in Lubumbashi, Kolwezi and Kinshasa – bringing our services and support closer to customers in this fast-growing region.”

The VAR partnership will provide locally accessible support and skills, substantial stockholding, and quality products at competitive pricing, the company said. It will also build strong and service-oriented customer relationships, according to Milan.

Zest WEG has also appointed DRC firm AEMI as a WEG-accredited repair facility, after AEMI successfully met its OEM standards. The company has a full repair facility in Likasi, and another in Kinshasa.

WEG looks to attract iron ore miners with latest slip-ring motors

WEG has unveiled its new M Mining series of slip-ring motors that, it says, are intended for dusty environments in the iron ore or cement sectors.

Available in frame sizes IEC 355 to IEC 1000, the new M Mining slip-ring motors cover the power range from 250 kW-10 MW at 50 Hz or 60 Hz line frequency. These three-phase induction motors are between four and 14 poles and designed for voltages up to 13.8 kV, making them a reliable choice for mills, crushers, blowers, exhaust fans, conveyors, centrifuges, and other applications in the mining and cement industries, it said.

Andreas Schulte Mesum, Director European High Voltage Solutions, based at WEG Germany GmbH, said: “Their performance and robustness make the new M Mining series of motors, with their high IP rating, steel casing and two different brush systems, an excellent choice for applications in the mining and cement industries. The design is based on specific electromechanical properties that offer long life and high stability.”

The wound rotors of slip ring motors allow them to achieve high starting torques along with low start-up current. In contrast to squirrel-cage motors, the windings are connected to three slip rings to allow a variable resistance to be inserted in the rotor circuit. This has several major benefits for users including higher rotor circuit resistance to improve the motor’s start-up characteristics; the motor starting current and rated current are close to the same; and loads with high starting torque can be driven, as well as loads with high inertia. Further advantages include higher efficiency and simple installation, WEG said.

The new motor series has a brush compartment with a new design and transparent window for inspection and access. Commissioning is aided by combining the motor with a fully integrated control panel as an option, according to the company. At the same time, operating and maintenance costs are reduced and plant availability is increased.

The motor series is available in two versions: either with a brush lifting device, or with brushes in constant contact. “The lifting mechanism of the brush lifting device has been redesigned to make it even easier to maintain,” WEG said. “Compared to the version with fixed brushes, the brush lifting system requires less maintenance. In addition, brush wear is reduced by fitted pressure springs. An integrated control system is also available as an option for the brush lifting device.”

With its innovative design and new insulation arrangement, the system offers other advantages.

“For example, the cooling system of the brush compartment is independent of the motor cooling system, further boosting the efficiency,” WEG said. “The extended lifetime of the brushes is one of the main advantages, but user access to the brush compartment is also significantly easier with this version. The brush compartment achieves an IP rating of up to IP66.”

The M Mining motors are available with protection ratings from IP55 to IP66. They are also protected by WEG paint systems that enable operation in abrasive and humid environments with atmospheric sulphur dioxide.

Kwatani makes manufacturing commitment on comminution equipment

Vibrating screen and feeder original equipment manufacturer (OEM), Kwatani, is promoting the need for high-quality engineering and the strictest tolerances for unbalanced motors and gearboxes to ensure components can run over the long term.

The harsh operating conditions that screens face in mining operations makes having these safeguards in place all the more important, it says.

According to Kenny Mayhew-Ridgers, Chief Operating Officer at Kwatani, local design and manufacture to the highest standard is a “non-negotiable”, with the OEM designing its own range of motors, as well as locally manufacturing the gearboxes for its vibrating screens.

“We design our own motors with local conditions in mind, giving the customer a high performance and long lasting product,” Mayhew-Ridgers says.

This includes optimal sealing arrangements for keeping electrical components dry and clean, Kwatani says. Power cables, for instance, must always enter from the underside to prevent water ingress, while the design must consider various orientations of the motor, depending on the angle of installation. Dusty conditions on mines also present a challenge that need to be addressed.

“Dust ingress can compromise the sealing configuration of the lid,” he says. “Our design is therefore like a top-hat, so the O-ring is not on a flat surface but rather on a cylindrical, vertical surface. There is even a double-sealing arrangement for the lid, which includes a gasket.”

Kwatani’s gearboxes are locally manufactured, with only the high quality bearings imported direct from leading global producers, it says. Gearboxes comprise two shafts, each with its own set of unbalanced weights linked to each other by a gear to achieve synchronised motion. Gears and shafts, meanwhile, are locally fabricated by selected suppliers, while the housing is cast by a local foundry and machined to exacting specifications.

“We have spent a great deal of effort on the sealing configuration, to ensure no oil leaks,” he says.

Mayhew-Ridgers says Kwatani is probably the only OEM that services its own gearboxes. This, he says, ensures adherence to strict tolerances, so that units have sustained performance and longevity.

He also highlights the massive centripetal forces exerted on the screening machine by the unbalanced motor and gearbox, which makes it vital to secure them well to the screen.

“To achieve this, we specify our own fabricated bolts, nuts and washers,” he says. “If sub-standard fasteners are used, components can come loose and cause extensive damage.”

Unbalanced motors usually have to be installed at an angle. Taking account of the weight of these components, there are rigging points all around the housing to manipulate the angle of installation. The feet of are normally larger in Kwatani installations than those of competitors, for a better contact surface, the company says.

“If there is the slightest imperfection in the flat surface of the join, this can cause costly damage to the drive and the screen,” Mayhew-Ridgers says. “This is why OEMs like Kwatani have such detailed installation procedures on issues like torqueing of bolts. Installers and maintenance teams need to stick closely to these specifications.”