Tag Archives: roadheader

Innovative roadheader to soon start up at JSW’s Budryk coal mine

A modern roadheader system equipped with a Komatsu Mining-manufactured bolter miner has been handed over to Polish coal miner JSW during celebrations in Tychy, Silesia.

The event, which featured a demonstration of the system’s capabilities, acted as a precursor for the hardware being delivered to the Budryk mine in Ornontowice, one of the deepest hard coal mines in the world.

The coal miner said: “JSW’s decision to purchase the roadheader may mark the most significant technological breakthrough in the Polish mining industry for many years. The research and development project, entitled ‘Independent Rockbolt Support’, is an innovative technology which may change not only the roadway works performed in JSW mines, but also may provide valuable inspiration for development for the entire Polish mining industry.”

Back in January, JSW reported that SIGMA was to deliver a system normally employed for cutting longwall faces and other areas in mines for roadway excavation, employing this specialist bolter miner.

The project sought to adapt the solutions used globally in the most modern deep shaft mines in the US and Australia, among other places, JSW said.

Włodzimierz Hereźniak, President of the JSW SA Management Board, said: “This is a revolution in Polish mining. The implementation of this hardware aims primarily to increase mining and reduce its cost. All these efforts follow from our strategy providing for reducing mining costs and expediting preparatory works in JSW mines.”

The construction of the Bolter Miner 12CM30 in the US lasted one year. In May, the miner was delivered to Poland and, over the next few days, it will be disassembled and transported to Budryk.

There, it will be assembled in the “Bw –1N badawczy” roadway – a process expected to take around three weeks. The miner will start working in the pit in November. cutting longwall faces and other areas in mines to be used for roadway excavation employing a specialist bolter miner.

The roadheader will be equipped with a 5.6-m wide cylindrical cutting head, with the project involving construction of six anchors in the pit’s ceiling and three anchors in the sidewalls. According to the assumptions, the roadheader will drill 15 m/d in the pit.

The project is the company’s response to the challenges awaiting it in the years to come, one of them being the need to increase the front of preparatory works in its deep coal mines.

The modern system to be used in JSW has been developed by a consortium of cooperating entities: JSW Innowacje as the consortium leader, JSW, the Central Mining Institute and Komatsu Mining (Joy Global).

Second Sandvik roadheader heading to Turquoise Ridge gold mine

The transition of Barrick Gold and Newmont Mining’s Turquoise Ridge gold mine (owned 75:25) in Nevada, US, to a Tier One operation is tracking to plan, the Canada-based miner said recently, with the Sandvik MR361 roadheader it took delivery of back in 2017 continuing to prove its worth.

Barrick said in its December quarter results that it is looking to increase production and resources at Turquoise Ridge through mechanisation, automation, and innovation.

The ramp up of the roadheader over 2018 improved safety, increased throughput, and dropped mining costs per tonne, the company said in its results statement. This has led to Barrick ordering a second roadheader, manufactured by Sandvik, which will be delivered to the operation later this year. On top of this, Barrick said it is evaluating the opportunity associated with increasing the level of mechanisation and automation for the operation.

Barrick already has extensive experience using Sandvik roadheaders, with the company having employed a MH620 unit at its Cortez gold mine, also in Nevada, US. Weighing 125 t and driven by a 300-kW cutting motor, the MH620 cutting the Range Front declines at Cortez is one of the world’s largest roadheaders.

Construction of a third shaft at Turquoise Ridge continues to advance according to schedule and within budget, Barrick said in the results statement, with efforts in 2019 focused on earthworks and shaft sinking.

“The construction of this shaft is expected to increase annual production to more than 500,000 oz/y (100% basis), at an average cost of sales of around $720/oz, and average all-in sustaining costs of roughly $630/oz,” Barrick said.

“As of December 31, we have spent $62 million (including $3 million in the December quarter of 2018) out of a total estimated capital cost of $300-$325 million (100% basis) on the construction of this shaft.”

Initial production from the new shaft is expected to begin in 2022, with sustained production from 2023.

Since the end of 2015, reserves at Turquoise Ridge have increased by 3.5 Moz (100% basis), primarily through driving down mining costs per tonne, which has allowed for a lower cutoff grade, thereby optimising the way the orebody is mined.

“The focus in 2019 is to realise the potential to further grow reserves, extend mine life, and grow production over and above the current mine plan, through reducing costs to further lower the cutoff grade, as well as extending mineralisation at depth,” Barrick said.