Tag Archives: rock drills

Sandvik introduces Sandvik DL422i top hammer longhole drill rig

Sandvik Mining and Rock Solutions has introduced its newest i-series top hammer longhole drill rig, the .

Following the launch of the Sandvik DL422iE battery-electric drill in 2021, Sandvik has now introduced its diesel counterpart, designed for underground mass mining in 4 x 4 m or larger production drifts.

The Sandvik DL422i offers the same productivity, reliability and high utilisation of its battery-electric counterpart for operations with challenging site conditions that are not optimised for a battery-electric fleet, the company explained.

“The new DL422i expands our i-series longhole production drill offering with traditional diesel engine layout, and starts to take over the work load of its famous predecessor, Sandvik DL421,” Sami Anttila, Product Line Manager, Longhole Production Drilling, said.

The Sandvik DL422i prioritises automated operations, fleet connectivity, availability of data and improved hole accuracy, supported by Sandvik’s technical support and operator training for an improved user experience, the OEM says. Automated operations over shift changes allows up to 20% increased productivity and up to 10% more drilled meters in a shift.

The longhole production drill is a highly intelligent and automated drill in Sandvik’s i-series underground drilling offering, with options for both automation and tele-remote operation.

It is compatible with Sandvik’s Platinum level automation package, which includes one-hole and fan automation, automatic boom repositioning to the next hole, automatic stinger control, drill plan and as-drilled data management (WLAN), plus connectivity to My Sandvik remote monitoring and Sandvik DrillConnect mobile application. Later in 2022, the Sandvik DL422i will also be compatible with Sandvik’s tele-remote drilling and tramming offering, expanding remote control from single to multiple units from a single console.

In operations with low, or no, mine network connectivity, the Sandvik DrillConnect mobile application can be used for easy and smooth drill plan transfer, comprehensive data collection, and intelligent troubleshooting, according to the company.

The Sandvik DL422i is billed as providing maximum productivity and safety, having been developed with the future of mining in mind. The control system platform allows for new technology implementation during the product lifetime, while tele-remote and automated drilling allows for unmanned operation through shift changes and breaks, increasing fleet use.

The powerful HF1560ST rock drill offers improved energy transfer and stability with high penetration rates and drilling capacity, Sandvik added.

Sandvik’s new i-class cabin provides the safest and most comfortable working environment with improved visibility in operation, reduced sound pressure level during drilling, adjustable drilling control panel, and multi-purpose seat with back and head support, Sandvik says. Swing out frames, meanwhile, provide easy, safe and fast access to the main components from the ground level.

Sandvik to accelerate rock drill developments with new innovation centre

Sandvik Mining and Rock Technology, in an effort to speed up rock drill innovations, has opened a new Rock Drills Innovation Center in Tampere, Finland.

Announced during day one of its Innovation in Mining event this week, the centre will introduce state-of-the-art production and testing facilities for this core Sandvik technology. It will be home to extensive rock knowledge and drilling technology expertise, creating a hub for innovation, the company says. The centre will also complement Sandvik’s existing leading drilling technology competence centre, consisting of an R&D centre, an underground test mine with laboratories, a modern factory environment and university cooperation.

IM put some questions to Timo Laitinen, Vice President of the Rock Drills business unit, to find out more about the €18 million ($21 million) investment.

IM: How will the new innovation centre help the Rock Drills business unit more rapidly develop new products?

TL: We wanted to bring all key functions needed in the development and production of rock drills under one roof. This makes communication between different functions more effective and enhances cross-functional work when developing new products.

Also, as reliability is the most important characteristic in rock drills – and the key feature of Sandvik rock drills – based on our recent customer survey, we increased our durability testing capacity. Now we can do even more endurance testing in a shorter calendar time.

Thirdly, our factory investments speed up prototype production, minimising waiting times between the iteration rounds. All these speed up time to market.

IM: What new technology, expertise, innovation, etc will you be leveraging to speed up the R&D and product development pipeline?

TL: In addition to what I mentioned above, we utilise a Lean & Agile methodology in our R&D with increased customer involvement, transparency and cross-functional cooperation. As Sandvik’s drilling equipment development, as well as digital technology development, happens for the most part here in Tampere at the same site, we can leverage that work for rock drill development too. Digital technology helps read data from Sandvik drilling equipment and service operations around the world, which we utilise to create even better rock drills. Sandvik’s expertise in machining solutions has helped us to integrate advanced quality assurance solutions in our production system. This generates valuable information for rock drill research and development.

IM: Will the Rock Drills business unit have a designated area of the Tampere Test Mine to test prototypes? Was the division previously using the existing test mine facilities?

TL: We have always had a certain designated area in our test mine for rock drill testing. With this investment program for the Rock Drills Innovation Center, we did build a new area in the test mine for this purpose with increased safety and functionality, more capacity and more space.

IM: In terms of R&D, what areas will the innovation centre focus on? What problems/challenges are your customers continuously talking about that you hope to address with this new facility?

TL: Drilling the holes for explosives comes first in the drill & blast production cycle, followed by the other phases of the cycle. Therefore, it was not a surprise to us when the customer survey result was that ‘reliability’ was the most important feature of a rock drill; followed by productivity and operating cost per metre. In addition to further developing these features in Sandvik rock drills, digital technology is sneaking into our rock drills. Our Rock Pulse technology is a prime example of new technology, which helps our customers drill more, better and at lower cost.

Epiroc breaks ground at heat treatment facility for rock drills

Epiroc has held a groundbreaking ceremony for its new heat treatment plant for rock drills at one of its global manufacturing hubs in Örebro, Sweden.

With heat treatment an essential part of rock drill manufacturing, the top-modern plant – to be built through an expansion of the current workshop building – will further boost rock drill quality and performance, according to Epiroc. It will also lower customers’ total cost of ownership and enable higher production volumes, the company added.

Helena Hedblom, Epiroc’s Senior Executive Vice President Mining and Infrastructure, said: “The investment is a key step toward ensuring that this first-class manufacturing site remains as productive and competitive as possible for the long term.”

Production at the 1,400 m² heat treatment plant will be able to run 24 hours a day thanks to automation. It is expected to be up and running by late-2020.

Energy efficiency is a key focus for the design of the plant, with, for example, residual heat recycled internally to heat buildings.