Tag Archives: Science Based Targets initiative

Newmont aims for net zero carbon emissions by 2030

Newmont has announced what, it says, are “industry-leading climate targets” to reduce its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 30%, with an ultimate goal of achieving net zero carbon emissions by 2050.

The new 2030 target builds upon Newmont’s existing GHG emissions reductions target of 16.5% over five years, concluding in 2020.

“At Newmont, we hold ourselves to high standards – from the way in which we govern our business, to how we manage relationships with our stakeholders, to our environmental stewardship and safety practices,” Tom Palmer, President and CEO of Newmont, said. “We fundamentally understand the human contribution to climate change and understand we reap what we sow. It is our responsibility to take care of the resources provided to us.

“We take these climate change commitments seriously, and make them because our relationship with the planet is absolute. We want a world that is not just sustainable, but thriving for generations to come.”

Using science-based criteria, Newmont has set climate targets for 2021-2030 for its operating sites, including a renewable energy target. The science-based criteria align with Science-Based Targets Initiative criteria and assists Newmont in developing specific emissions reduction pathways and meeting the Paris Agreement objective of being well below 2°C global temperature change, the miner says.

To achieve these aims, the company will implement a new energy and climate investment standard, to be combined with its existing investment standards including shadow carbon pricing, in order to further inform its capital investment process, it said.

“This new investment standard will ensure that the 2030 reduction targets are embedded into investment decisions for projects such as fleet vehicles, production equipment, on-site renewable power generation and energy efficiency,” the company said. “Additionally, the company will engage its partners and joint ventures in an effort to align joint venture operations targets and supply chain related emissions with Newmont’s targets.”

Mining is an energy intensive business, with 88% of Newmont’s energy used for mining and milling generated from carbon-based fuels, it said. As the company looks to reduce emissions and move to a low carbon economy, it will use a strategic approach to portfolio development, energy sourcing, fleet and equipment investment, as well as land use planning to achieve its targets.

A key part of Newmont’s accountability in reaching these targets will be reporting via The Climate-Related Financial Disclosures (TCFD) guidelines. In 2021, the company will issue its first annual TCFD report. The TCFD report will detail Newmont’s governance, strategy and portfolio resilience to a range of climate scenarios. The TCFD report will also track Newmont’s annual progress toward implementing its 2030 strategy, meeting its 2030 targets and executing emissions reduction projects across its global portfolio.

Metso Outotec to sell recycling business as it focuses on ‘core’ synergies

Metso Outotec has spelt out a three-pillar focus in a new strategy and financial targets update, saying it is looking to divest its Recycling business and concentrate its attention on the aggregates, minerals processing and metals refining industries.

The new strategy, focused on growth and improving profitability, was published on the same day as the company’s January-September 2020 interim review was released.

This showed orders received were 28% lower in the September quarter of 2020 than the same period a year ago, at €2.9 billion ($3.4 billion), while the company’s adjusted EBITA and operating profit were down 29% and 63% year-on-year at €109 million and €47 million, respectively. President and CEO, Pekka Vauramo, said the COVID-19 pandemic continued to have an impact on the company’s end markets during the quarter, with the most significant impacts resulting from limited access to customer sites and slow decision making related to new project and modernisation orders and non-critical services.

With the merger of Metso and Outotec having completed on June 30, Metso Outotec has now had the chance to evaluate the opportunities within the enlarged group, which it spelt out in this update.

The company said it aims to become a “top-tier supplier of products, technologies and services in the aggregates and minerals industries and a top financial performer”, adding that its defined purpose is: “enabling sustainable modern life”.

Against this remit, the company said its foundation for implementing its new strategy and achieving its goals are based on the following factors:

  • Comprehensive product and service offering as well as process expertise throughout the customers’ value chain;
  • Extensive installed base and a strong brand;
  • Strong aftermarket presence and know-how close to customers; and
  • Industry-leading, sustainability-focused technology, research and product development expertise.

When it comes to growth, the company said its key customer segments are aggregates, minerals processing, and certain areas of metals refining.

“The company’s target markets offer attractive growth prospects and have significant potential for further growth and development of the aftermarket business,” it said. “Several recognised global megatrends, like urbanisation, infrastructure projects, electrification of societies, and climate change mitigation, will support market growth.”

Metso Outotec’s primary target in the selected segments is to develop its product and service business by leveraging its process expertise. “In order to reduce business risks and to improve profitability, extensive project deliveries will be limited when they include other than the company’s own technology and expertise,” it said.

The company laid out four priority areas of strategy implementation including: integration and financial performance; customer centricity; sustainability; and performance culture.

These priority areas are visible in each business area’s action plans and their realisation is measured and managed with several performance indicators, it added.

Vauramo, who has also agreed to lead the company until the end of 2023, said: “Metso Outotec’s new strategy is coherent and clear, and it will help us to become an industry-leading company in customer satisfaction, sustainability and financial performance. Based on a careful assessment of our businesses and the opportunities they offer, we have selected the areas we will focus on.

“The aggregates and minerals industries have clear roles at the core of our strategy. Global megatrends are driving their development, and we are well positioned to offer products, solutions and services that satisfy customer demands.

“In the Metals business, we will initiate a restructuring and turnaround program to improve financial performance and ensure more granular management of the various businesses and resources. This work will lead us to scope our offering and resources in a more efficient way.”

As a result of this strategy work, Metso Outotec has decided to divest its recycling business. While the circular economy and other market drivers offer attractive opportunities for developing this business, Vauramo said it has limited synergies with the core of the new Metso Outotec.

“This being the case, we have started preparations to divest the business,” he said. “I am confident that we will reach a solution that is good for Metso Outotec as well as for the Recycling business and its personnel.”

The Recycling business sells products and services for metal and waste recycling. Its sales in 2019 were €156 million, and it reported an adjusted EBITA margin of around 6%.

Speaking of synergies, Vauramo updated investors on its plan to generate total cost synergies of €120 million by the end of 2021 through the merger process.

At the end of the September quarter, it had reached an annual run rate of €31 million in cost synergies, it said. This compares with the year-end estimate of €50 million.

“In addition, we were able to realise the first revenue synergies during the quarter by capitalising on cross-selling opportunities in the services business,” Vauramo said.

As part of the strategy work, Metso Outotec’s Board of Directors has approved the following financial targets:

  • Adjusted EBITA margin of >15% over the cycle;
  • Maintaining an ‘investment-grade’ credit rating;
  • Dividend payout of at least 50% of earnings per share; and
  • Progress in sustainability in alignment with the 1.5°C commitment.

“The financial targets underline our intention to improve the company’s profitability and drive sustainable solutions in our industry,” Vauramo said. “The most significant factors in this development are the benefits related to integration and synergies, the businesses’ own profitability improvement actions, increasing market shares, and developing our business portfolio. At the same time, we will strengthen the company’s balance sheet by using cash from operations to reduce indebtedness.

“For shareholders, Metso Outotec’s ambition is to be a good payer of dividends.”

With Metso Outotec already outlining its “1.5°C journey”, with targets validated by the Science Based Targets initiative, the company is well on its way to making progress on this front.

In the strategy update, the company said this will be implemented through a focus on sustainable offerings and innovations, and by being a responsible and trusted partner.

Metso Outotec has set targets to reduce the emissions of its own operations by 50% by 2030, compared with the 2019 baseline, and to reduce the emissions of logistics by 20% by 2025. It is also targeting that 30% of the supplier spend by the end of 2025 is with partners who have set a CO2 target.

“Metso Outotec will continuously develop sustainable solutions for its customers, with a focus on energy and emission efficiency, water efficiency, circular solutions and safety,” it said. “Over 90% of the company’s R&D projects are targeted to have energy, emissions or water targets.”

Metso looks to grind down GHG emissions with energy-efficient technology

Having recently won the approval of the Science Based Targets initiative (SBTi) for its greenhouse gas (GHG) targets, Metso’s Climate Program now has the recognition it deserves.

The GHG goals are applicable to all relevant emission sources: production, procurement, inbound and outbound transportation as well as the use of Metso’s products.

Following on from this environmental win, IM put some questions to Metso’s Director of Sustainable Business Development, Kaisa Jungman, to find out what impact these climate change aims might have on the mining equipment manufacturers’ product offering and how the company is already leading from the front with its environmental sustainability initiatives.

It’s worth acknowledging, first, that these GHG goals are all-encompassing.

As a scope 1 and 2 GHG target, Metso has committed to a 25% reduction in carbon emissions in production by 2030, while 30% of its suppliers – in terms of spend – are required to set science-based emission targets by 2024. Metso also aims for a 20% reduction in transportation emissions by 2025 (scope 3 GHG emissions target) by streamlining transportation routes and optimising warehouse locations.

Through extensive research and development work, Metso says it has been able to significantly reduce the energy consumption in customer processes. To continue this development, the company is aiming for a 10% reduction in GHG emissions in the most “energy-intensive customer processes” using Metso products by 2025.

The company is also demanding energy-efficiency targets in its Metso R&D projects, and offsetting flight emissions by 100% by 2021.

The target to lower GHG emissions by 10% in the most “energy-intensive customer processes” stood out in these targets, and it was hardly surprising to find out grinding falls into this category.

“Grinding is the most energy-intensive stage of minerals processing,” Jungman said. “Overall, it is estimated that comminution counts for 3-5% of the energy consumption in the world and grinding is part of this.”

In the company’s climate program it has included three of its products – the HRC™ high pressure grinding roll, Vertimill® and stirred SMD (stirred media detritor) – to help achieve this 10% cut in GHGs.

“We have estimated, based on our installed base, in 2018, that approximately 1,073,648 t of CO2 emissions were saved through these energy efficient grinding technologies,” she said, explaining that these savings were calculated by comparing its three solutions with conventional technology.

At this stage, it is only the HRC, Vertimill and SMD included in this calculation – due to their substantial energy and emission reduction credentials and the company’s ability to quantify accurately the estimated savings – but Jungman said Metso plans to widen the scope of the technologies to be included.

“In addition to our climate program, we are also looking into other environmental benefits the customers are gaining through our solutions,” she said.

“To improve energy and emissions efficiency in the future, our target is that all our R&D projects will set energy-efficiency targets by 2021.”

She concluded on these technologies: “I would say that this climate program is an important first step and we will continue developing even more comprehensive sustainability targets for our technologies.”

When it comes to displaying evidence of where the company is reducing scope 1 (generated from fuels used in production) and 2 (generated from purchased energy) emissions, Jungman could point to several examples.

“We have installed solar panels in some of our locations already and are looking now for opportunities to install more in several locations in the coming years,” she said.

In some of the company’s facilities, a percentage of the electricity it purchases is already from renewable sources, and Metso is investigating the possibilities of expanding this, Jungman added.

“In addition to electricity consumption, we are also searching for renewable alternatives for the other forms of our energy consumption, including, for example, replacing natural gas consumption with renewable alternatives.”

The company has also, in recent years, invested in many energy efficiency and renewable energy projects, according to Jungman.

“As an example, in our foundry in China, we have invested in a new type of melting furnace to gain better energy efficiency.

“In another production location, we have installed technology to recover process heat from the exhaust air to be used as heating energy. We have also invested in the process automation and insulation of the furnaces to gain better energy efficiency.”

She concluded: “Reducing greenhouse gas emissions is something we take seriously, and to which Metso is fully committed. We want all our stakeholders to be involved in the work to reach these important targets and to aim even higher.”

Metso’s GHG targets recognised as ‘science-based’

Metso’s greenhouse gas (GHG) emission targets have won the approval of the Science Based Targets initiative (SBTi), demonstrating the mining equipment and service provider is doing its fair share in trying to achieve the global climate change goals as set out in the 2015 Paris Agreement.

The GHG targets are part of Metso’s Climate Program and, the company says, are applicable to all relevant emission sources: production, procurement, inbound and outbound transportation as well as the use of Metso’s products.

The SBTi is a collaboration between CDP, the United Nations Global Compact, World Resources Institute and the World Wide Fund for Nature. The initiative aims at promoting science-based target setting and driving down GHG emissions.

The initiative is tied to the 2015 Paris Agreement, which saw 195 of the world’s governments commit to prevent dangerous climate change by limiting global warming to below 2°C.

Metso says it is one of the few corporations in its field to join SBTi in the efforts to prevent global warming.

As a scope 1 and 2 GHG target, Metso has committed to a 25% reduction in carbon emissions in production by 2030. This is achievable by investing in renewable energy and improving the energy efficiency of the production processes, the company said.

“Metso demands sustainability not only of its own production, but also 30% of its suppliers in terms of spend are required to set science-based emission targets by 2024,” the company said.

By streamlining transportation routes and optimising warehouse locations, Metso aims for a 20% reduction in transportation emissions by 2025 (scope 3 GHG emissions target).

Through extensive research and development work, Metso has been able to significantly reduce the energy consumption in customer processes, it said. To continue this development, the company is aiming for a 10% reduction in GHG emissions in the most “energy-intensive customer processes” using Metso products by 2025.

“This is further reinforced by the demanding energy-efficiency targets in all Metso R&D projects. As supportive actions, Metso will also offset flight emissions by 100% by 2021 and continue to find new ways to decrease emissions, for example, in offices,” it said.

Metso President and CEO, Pekka Vauramo, said: “We are extremely happy about the ratification of our science-based CO2 emissions targets.

“Our Climate Program is an important step in our goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. It is also an essential element in Metso being a responsible and trusted partner to our customers. We aim to improve our customers’ productivity in a sustainable manner, and we involve all our stakeholders in reaching this goal.”

For Metso, Scope 1 emissions are generated from fuels used in production, Scope 2 emissions are generated from the purchased energy and Scope 3 emissions are generated from transportation, procurement, travelling and product use, it said.

In 2018, Metso’s emissions clocked in at over 1 Mt of CO2, including 655,732 t from purchased goods and services, 136,968 t related to production, 161,629 t in “upstream” transportation, 77,821 t in “downstream” transportation and 22,256 t in business flights.

At the same time, the emissions saved in Metso product use in 2018 amounted to more than 1.07 Mt of CO2 through its energy-efficient grinding solutions HRC™, Vertimill® and SMD (stirred media detritor).