Tag Archives: grinding

Metso Outotec ball mills, Vertimills heading to Mapa’s Liberia and Burkina Faso gold mines

The Turkish conglomerate, Mapa Group, has awarded Metso Outotec a contract for the delivery of key grinding technology to its gold mine expansion projects in Liberia and Burkina Faso.

The value of the order is approximately €19 million ($23 million), and it has been booked in the company’s Minerals June quarter orders received.

Mapa is a major conglomerate working in various industrial and construction sectors, including mining.

Mustafa Bülent Karaarslan, COO of the Mapa Group, said: “For us, good support, reliable project execution, and sustainable equipment and process performance are essential. Alongside the existing good relationship between the companies, they’re the reasons why we selected Metso Outotec for these projects.”

Metso Outotec will deliver identical grinding lines to both sites, consisting of state-of-the-art Premier™ ball mills (one pictured) and energy-efficient Vertimill® VTM-3000 stirred mills, each line featuring a capacity of 400 t/h. The deliveries are expected to take place in January 2022.

Mert Katkay, Head of Minerals Sales for Metso Outotec in the Middle East and Turkey, said: “We are excited that Mapa has chosen us to deliver the key equipment for the expansion of these two projects in Liberia and Burkina Faso. Previously, we have delivered the key crushing, screening and grinding equipment to these two mines.”

Weir Minerals wins large comminution order from Nigeria iron ore mine

Two of the largest screens built by Weir Minerals Africa are being designed and manufactured in South Africa as part of a process solution for an iron ore mine in Nigeria.

According to Tiisetso Masekwameng, General Manager Comminution at Weir Minerals Africa, the flowsheet accepted by the customer includes equipment for screening, washing, and grinding supplied by Weir Minerals.

“Within our scope of work are the two largest Enduron® double-deck banana screens built by Weir Minerals,” Masekwameng says. “This is made possible by the depth of design expertise in our Separation Technology Group, an eight-strong team conducting research and development.”

Steven Hunter, Separation Technology Group Leader at Weir Minerals Africa, says the two 51 t Enduron double-deck banana (DBHG 43/97) screens (one pictured) for this project were built upon the designs of the existing Weir Minerals screens range. These large machines measure 4.3 m wide and 9.7 m long and can process 1,750 t/h.

“The customer’s production requirements demanded this considerable size, so we optimised the design by minimising mass without compromising structural integrity,” Hunter says. “We conducted extensive finite element analysis on the whole machine but focused on the main structural elements, ensuring that the units were fit-for-purpose while still being light enough to be driven by the exciters.”

The size of the units still demanded the design and manufacture of Weir Minerals Africa’s largest exciter yet – the Enduron LTX 10. With 120 t of excitation force (at maximum setting), these units will drive the screens at a stroke of 9.4 mm and a gravitational force of 4.6 G.

Hunter said the screens are ready to be fitted with Weir’s IIoT platform, Synertrex. “This allows the machines to be monitored remotely; the system can measure the machine’s performance and any deviations arising that may require proactive attention,” he explained.

The order for Nigeria also includes two Trio® jaw crushers, two Trio cone crushers, two large 2 m by 8 m Trio apron feeders, two Trio pan feeders, eight Enduron vibrating screens and an Enduron HPGR.

For the clay washing circuit, Weir Minerals Africa will supply the mine with a Trio twin-shaft blade mill and Trio twin-shaft coarse washers as well as Warman® slurry pumps.

Metso Outotec delivers ‘next evolution’ in high pressure grinding rolls with HRCe

Metso Outotec has launched the “next evolution of the high pressure grinding roll”, with the delivery of its HRC™e HPGR.

The original HRC HPGR was launched back in 2014 by Metso (now Metso Outotec), pioneering the use of flanges and non-skewing design. The grinding performance that brings energy efficiency, lower circulating loads and increased throughput is now strengthened with an additional evolution in design, Metso Outotec says.

The new HRCe comes with a decreased installation capital expenditure compared with the original HRC. Changes in design allow for maximum productivity with proven technology that leads to superior grinding efficiency.

Christoph Hoetzel, Head of Grinding business line at Metso Outotec, said: “We are very excited about the new HRCe, which combines proven technology and customer-focused evolutions. Metso Outotec is the only OEM that has been able to design and develop reliable flanged HPGR technology that has demonstrated superior performance for many years in the mining industry. We will continue utilising our proven technology but have evolved the design to maximise value for our customers and superior grinding efficiency.”

The high throughput comes from the elimination of the edge effect with the flange design, which will ultimately maximise the amount of crushed material, the company says. With the anti-skew assembly, customers will find faster restarts and no downtime from skewing events, according to Metso Outotec.

The HRCe also comes with a large feed size acceptance of 60-120 mm and improved energy efficiency compared with similar HPGRs, the company says. It also boasts typical capacities of 1,810-6,930 t/h.

Key benefits of the new HPGR include:

  • Improved energy efficiency of up to 15%;
  • Lower circulating load of up to 24%;
  • Increased throughput of up to 19%;
  • Elimination of edge effect from combination of proven flange design and anti-skew assembly; and
  • Elimination of downtime caused by skewing events.

Filling the mineral processing flowsheet gaps

Crushing, grinding, flotation, solvent extraction, electro winning, tailings management…Metso Outotec covers it all.

The new mineral processing entity might be less than a week old, but many in the industry would have, no doubt, had some burning questions to ask since the planned merger was announced on July 4, 2019.

IM had a chance to put some of these questions to Stephan Kirsch, President Minerals business area, Metso Outotec, gaining an initial impression of what the combination of the two companies means for the Minerals business he heads up.

IM: What big mining industry challenge will the combined group be better placed to tackle? What equipment/solutions/expertise within the group are the most important in achieving these goals?

SK: One issue – although not technology-focused – is community engagement.

Some mining operations in the world face challenges in terms of engaging with local communities and returning benefits to them. There is a social responsibility for mining companies, as they are the operators, but also for mining industry supporters involved in such projects.

That said, the vast majority of the mining industry runs initiatives that ensure communities understand mining companies are not just there to extract the iron, copper or gold and make money from it. They give back to local stakeholders and help improve community standards.

Stephan Kirsch, President Minerals business area, Metso Outotec

From a technology perspective, an industry issue we are well equipped to tackle is tailings management. With our combined offering, we look very seriously into solutions that can involve dewatering, dry stacking, and the reprocessing of tailings.

You asked about the products involved in solving these challenges…that includes filtration technologies, bulk materials handling products for conveying and stacking, and then various ore sorting technologies for the reprocessing.

Another trend to highlight is the use of energy or, more specifically, the need to reduce power consumption. There is some work to do here.

When you go and buy a car, you tend to focus on the fuel consumption. The mining industry, however, aims for high installed power because there is a sentiment that more power in the mill means more product out of the mill, more fines and, as a result, better downstream recoveries. In a way that is true for technologies like horizontal mills, ball mills and SAG mills, but when you turn to different, newer technologies it is not always the case.

One of these technologies is HPGRs which were introduced in the minerals industry in the mid-80s. Today, HPGRs are used in high tonnage, competent, abrasive ore applications due to their lower specific power draw and other downstream benefits compared to conventional technologies.

One can add to this, conserving other natural resources such as water. Water scarcity is obviously a problem and we should look at the recycling of process water wherever possible (that is where the filtration technology comes into play again) at the same time as examining more energy-efficient flowsheets.

There is quite a bit we can do to solve some of these challenges from a mineral processing perspective, but, the problem is, the industry remains conservative and anything new takes time to be implemented sustainably.

IM: I know Metso has previously talked about creating a bulk ore sorting solution for industry. Considering this, do you as Metso Outotec expect to continue leveraging the agreement Outotec has in place with TOMRA to carry out more sensor-based ore sorting projects? Alongside this, will you continue with your own bulk sorting projects?

SK: Early removal of tailings/overburden from the processing plant feed has been the operator’s dream for probably a century! This concept of preconcentration has been a consideration for many years, but in the last 30 or so years, technologies with different sensors have been developed to help with this separation process.

It is the ability to use sensor technology to single out particles on a conveyor belt at an appropriate speed and quantity that is the industry challenge. After all, when it comes to mining, we are talking about bulk materials that must be processed, not single elements like you have in the recycling and food sectors where much of this sensor technology originated from.

You need to look at the operating economics of such plants. When I say economics, I am factoring in throughput and recovery rates: you want a high tonnage and you don’t want to waste your ore, which is already low grade compared with what was being mined, say, 30 years ago.

The answer to your question is that Metso has been looking into preconcentration technologies for some time – we have R&D projects and partners looking at it. The same is the case with Outotec. Going forward, we will analyse this and make a call on whatever is the best combination to continue with such work.

Personally, I am a big believer in segregating waste as early in the process as possible to save energy downstream. But there are technical challenges to this.

IM: Both companies have been expanding their modular offering in recent years (Metso with its flexible FIT™ stations and the smart Foresight™ stations/Outotec with its modular paste backfill plants and HIGmill): is a lot of your mining and metals R&D currently focused on reducing the footprint of your solutions?

SK: Our R&D budget – as you probably heard on the webcast last week – is quite significant when put together. As Metso Outotec committed to keep both of our budgets unchanged, the spend comes to about €100 million ($112 million). A market survey we carried out revealed that, in terms of R&D spend, we are at the top of the industry.

Then, we must spend this money wisely wherever we see it being applied most economically for the benefit of our customers and for Metso Outotec. The modular crushing stations you mention are an area of interest we started developing years ago. We see good potential for this modular offering and will continue to develop it.

As for the percentage of the budget we will dedicate to it, this will – like all R&D projects – be analysed alongside others for crushing, grinding and all separation technologies with a strong focus on product innovations, digitalisation and sustainability.

IM: As you hinted at earlier, do you see tailings management being one of the combined group’s core strengths?

SK: It is one big focus area for us, but only one.

Crushing and grinding, which I mentioned earlier, is another strong area. We are a market leader in some of the crushing technologies we offer, and high up the industry when it comes to grinding technologies. We plan to really expand on this side.

I mentioned HPGRs where we have brilliant, world-class technology, but are missing the installed base. With 20-25 years of HPGR experience, I know we have the technology to make a difference, we just need to effectively bring it to market.

The whole re-grind space is really a future area for us to pursue due to industry-wide issues of falling grades, the need to reduce power consumption and fine grinding requirements.

Back to the original question, I expect Metso Outotec to be a strong player for dewatering and tailings management solutions.

IM: Outotec has a much more developed downstream business in areas like hydrometallurgy and smelting, etc in mining than Metso – will this remain a core part of the combined group?

SK: The front-end strength of Metso for mineral processing plants and the wet processing business focus of Outotec shows how well both companies complement one another. From a technical perspective, this is one of the reasons why the merger of Metso and Outotec makes much sense.

IM: In what segments of the mining and metals market do you see the most complementary solutions within Metso and Outotec?

SK: When we brought these two companies together it is amazing how many renowned international mineral processing experts came with it. We can provide much more comprehensive services to the industry because we can look at the entire flowsheet – from run of mine ore, to metal.

Why is this so important for our customers? You can bundle equipment together to make tenders and dealing with OEMs more economical for mining companies. But, more than that, we can bring a much larger pool of experts to a project to interact and talk with each other to provide the right innovations. This is the ‘one plus one equals three’ effect.

We can also look at balancing the equipment so, for example, the primary crusher is appropriately configured to produce the right ore for the secondary crushing process and the screens are amply sized to effectively carry out their job. That then leads to finding the optimal operating point for the HPGRs and milling equipment and then the downstream processing segment. This type of equipment balancing is highly interesting for the market, creating win-win situations for customers and us as an OEM.

IM: Do you see your relationship with mining customers changing because of this holistic approach?

SK: Yes and no. There are companies that will appreciate this wider offering and there are others that will continue to come to us as part of a more traditional way of tendering for mineral processing equipment.

I see a trend where larger companies are coming back to reliable OEMs because the availability, sustainability and reliability of equipment is much more important than saving a dollar in capex in the first place. That is a trend we have seen strengthen even more recently with COVID; we all know when a plant is not running, it costs operators hundreds of thousands of dollars per day in lost revenue.

Yet, there are always customers that say capex is king. They will do everything they can to tender it most competitively from a capital expense perspective, regardless of the long-term total cost of ownership benefits choosing another solution will have.

IM: How will your digital offering be strengthened through the combination?

SK: At Metso, we started, especially in South America, with a strong operation and presence in terms of remote control and remote operating and maintenance support for processing plants.

The service solutions that have been developed and established in some countries, specifically for Metso and for Metso equipment, in the new company will, of course, be transferred into the installed base of Outotec (for example, a facility previous owned by Outotec in Espoo, Finland, is now a Metso Outotec Performance Center facility).

We often heard from customers: ‘We have great equipment from the Outotec side, but we have never experienced the great Metso services.’

What is so encouraging to see is that there is demand from the industry for such a combination of equipment and services.

IM: Where do you see an overlap of solutions (for instance, possibly crushing and grinding equipment (SAG/AG/ball mills), vertical crushing tech (Vertimill/HIG mill)) or flotation (Outotec has a greater market share but Metso supplies some interesting options like column flotation, plus is the leader in flotation camera monitoring with VisioFroth)? Historically, have you been competing against each other for contracts in these market segments?

SK: As you know, for 12 months or so, there was intense scrutiny from the regulatory authorities to find out if the companies could merge or not because of an overlap, and the answer that came back is yes.

From a regulatory authority perspective, there is no overlap, and, from a technical perspective, I view it in a similar way.

One prime example to give would be the Vertimill (below, left) and the HIGmill (below, right). If you look at both in detail and you talk to customers – which has happened when we have our project meetings and negotiations – you often find that the applications being examined are so specific that both mills, although close when it comes to operating process, have their own sweet spots.

                      

Most of the cases where we, as Metso and Outotec, won or lost a tender, the argument was not around price or sentiment; it was always technical where, for example, the feed was too coarse for the HIGmill, or the end product needed to be so fine that the Vertimill was ruled out.

We, therefore, want to continue offering both technologies; we will not shelve one because we believe there is room for both solutions.

IM: Could this combination then enable you to offer a more customised solution for customers?

SK: That is where the benefit (from the combined Metso Outotec) for the industry really kicks in; our customers are not just getting standard solutions; some tailoring is involved. They will be able to get more specific and solution-oriented, performance-balanced pieces of equipment.

IM: Would you like to add anything else?

SK: I need to say that I am quite excited about the opportunities for the new company, Metso Outotec. There are benefits for both us and the wider industry.

Personally, I am humbled to be elected to run such a large organisation of industry experts and high-quality equipment. It is exciting times ahead.

Outotec adds HIGmill to list of modular mining solutions

Outotec is modularising its high intensity grinding mill solution as it looks to improve safety, speed up return on investment and minimise plant footprints when it comes to grinding mill installations.

The Outotec HIGmill plant (HMP) is a standalone, modular solution for fine grinding that addresses these conflicting requirements, the company says.

Consisting of a vertical HIGmill unit and pre-engineered auxiliary equipment modules to reduce engineering, delivery, construction, and commissioning time and cost, it still provides a safe solution with the flexibility to meet various process, layout, and regulatory requirements, according to the company.

These modules are preassembled in the factory to reduce safety risks and maintain the highest possible quality while also reducing on-site construction time and cost.

“The modules and vertical HIGmill can be arranged in a compact footprint to suit the specific site layout, minimising layout and engineering work,” Outotec said.

The HMP includes an Outotec PSI® 500i particle size analyser for continuous online process monitoring and feedback, while the HIGmill provides process flexibility by adjusting the speed to match the energy input for the required product particle size. This, the company says, minimises the risk of operational challenges and reduced recoveries resulting from variable process conditions.

Bjorn Nielsen, Director – Product Management, Grinding at Outotec, talking about the benefits of using the HIGmill®, told IM earlier this year: “The Outotec HIGmill has several key advantages over other fine and ultra-fine grinding technologies. The vertical arrangement means that gravity helps to compress the media bed, ensuring high contact loads between media symmetrical energy transfer throughout the charge. As a result, the HIGmill has a very broad operating range – energy efficiency is very similar for a range of media charge levels and operating speeds.

“This operating flexibility lets us deal with variations in feed particle size while maintaining efficient operation – there is no point having the most efficient equipment in the world if it cannot be continuously operated at its most efficient.”

Riddhika Jain, Product Manager at Outotec, said the HMP combines Outotec’s leading fine grinding technology with faster installation and a compact footprint while maintaining safety standards.

“This standalone modular solution comes in easily installable pre-assembled sections to speed up returns on investment,” Jain added.

Like Outotec’s other modular solutions – such as the VSF®X modular concept and Modular Paste Backfill Plant – the HMP helps optimise delivery lead time and site construction planning. The delivery scope typically consists of a HIGmill, cyclone, hoppers, pumps, media crane, steel modules, switch room, pipes, valves, instruments, and control system.

NRRI and Weir Minerals offer up HPGR alternative to Minnesota Iron Range operators

The University of Minnesota Duluth’s Natural Resources Research Institute (NRRI) is helping introduce high pressure grinding roll (HPGR) technology to Minnesota’s Iron Range.

Working with Weir Minerals, NRRI acquired an industrial-scale Enduron® HPGR to carry out testing on a variety of ores with this process. This is the only large scale HPGR dedicated to research in the US, NRRI claims.

The NRRI explained: “Traditional taconite pellet-making processes use a rod mill to get the rock to the consistency of coarse sand, and a ball mill to grind the rock into a fine powder. This technology is still in use on Minnesota’s Iron Range by some facilities.

“A taconite plant may have as many as 18 rod mills with one rod alone weighing as much as 500 Ib (227 kg). Tumbling around in the mills with the hard taconite wears away the rods and balls and need to be replaced frequently.”

This is a costly and energy-intensive process and the waste rods and balls are a disposal problem, according to NRRI.

NRRI researchers think there’s a better and more efficient way of carrying out this grinding process with the use of HPGRs.

Tim Lundquist, Weir HPGR Manager for North America, said: “NRRI has done a lot of testing for many of our projects. The proximity to the Iron Range is key, but we’ll also bring in material from all over the US, Canada, and elsewhere when it makes sense. Our preference is to work with NRRI whenever possible due to their flexibility, expediency and expertise.”

Unlike rod or ball mills, HPGRs reduce particles by compressing and crushing the feed between two counter rotating, parallel rollers with a small gap between them. This forces the rocks against each other. There are no rods or balls that need replacing and it reduces energy consumption by about 40% for certain ore types, Breneman said. It also substantially reduces water consumption compared with rod and ball mills.

Reducing energy, eliminating costly grinding media, and higher machine availability will make the Minnesota iron industry more cost competitive while also offering the opportunity to reduce greenhouse gas generation, NRRI said.

NRRI Metallurgical Engineer, Shashi Rao, Lead Researcher on HPGR-related projects at NRRI Coleraine, said: “It’s really helpful to the industry to have their ores tested in our large HPGR before replacing their rod or ball mills.

“We’re able to determine if the ore is amenable to high pressure roll crushing, identify the mineral composition, and test a variety of pressures and roll speeds. Third-party testing is very important.”

Keeping the project moving ahead during the COVID-19 pandemic required extra steps and protocols, according to NRRI. This work was coordinated by NRRI Project Engineer, Jeff Kinkel.

“The machine is isolated to one specific area,” Kinkel said. “We adhered to strict sanitation and masking requirements and communicated daily with the contractor doing the installation.”

NRRI acquired the HPGR technology via Weir Minerals from the shuttered Magnetation LLC operation and both organisations are sharing the cost of maintenance.

“This is a great example of a partnership project,” Kevin Kangas, NRRI Coleraine Director, said. “We’ve been working on this for over two years and it’s exciting to have the global interest in this capability.”

The process is now in place at a Minnesota Iron Range facility with a Weir Minerals Enduron HPGR.

On average, 53% of a mine site’s energy consumption is attributed to crushing and grinding ores, accounting for almost 10% of a site’s production costs, according to information from Weir Minerals. NRRI’s HPGR is manufactured in the Netherlands by Weir Minerals.

FLSmidth to help modernise crushing, grinding circuit at Zijin’s Serbia copper op

Zijin Mining Group has chosen an FLSmidth gyratory crusher, SAG mill and ball mill for the Majdanpek mine, part of the Chinese mining company’s majority owned Zijin Bor copper mine, in Serbia.

The delivery of the equipment to Majdanpek, 180 km from Belgrade, is expected to occur between 12 and 18 months from now, with the project estimated to reach completion by the end of 2020. The order has a combined value of around DKK200 million ($30 million), according to FLSmidth, and has been recognised in the order intake for the September quarter.

The order of the new FLSmidth crushing and grinding circuit for the front end of the concentrator comes as Zijin looks to modernise Majdanpek, which will be the largest of its three Serbian copper concentrators, FLSmidth said.

Acquired as part of the majority acquisition of Bor in late 2018, the Majdanpek mine uses open-pit mining and flotation to produce copper concentrates, with a designed mining and processing scale of 10 Mt/y, according to Zijin. The operation is currently at a scale of 6 Mt/y, it said.

In the next six years, the company says it plans to invest more than $1 billion in the upgrading, expansion, or construction of the four mines and smelter at Bor. After the completion of the first phase of the project, it is estimated output will go to 82,000 t/y of copper in concentrates, with the smelter producing 80,000 t/y of copper cathode. After the completion of phase two, this could go to 120,000 t/y of concentrate and 150,000 t/y of cathode.

Manfred Schaffer, President of Mining and Group Executive Vice President at FLSmidth, said: “This extensive order underlines the strong value proposition of FLSmidth to our customers in the copper industry. Our market leading crushers and mills will provide significant improvements for Zijin Mining in terms of productivity and processing efficiency.”

Hummingbird making short work of second ball mill project at Yanfolila gold mine

Hummingbird Resources’ plan to install a second ball mill and increase production capacity at its Yanfolila gold mine, in Mali, is tracking ahead of expectations, the company says.

The second ball mill will increase throughput capacity from 1 Mt/y to 1.24 Mt/y when operating at 100% fresh ore and from 1.2 Mt/y to 1.4 Mt/y when processing a blend of ore types, according to Hummingbird.

The mill was deemed the preferential choice when considering the alternative option of installing a tertiary crusher, which was included in the mine’s definitive feasibility study.

Since commencing the project in September 2018, the company has continued to reach advancement targets and both the engineering and civil works are now fully complete, Hummingbird said.

Back then, the company said the mill installation was expected to set the company back $13 million, with the plant due to be operational this September quarter.

The Yanfolila crushing circuit is currently a two-stage operation incorporating both primary and secondary crushing circuits designed to treat a blend of oxide and harder ores. The ore is non-refractory and the process plant design uses gravity and carbon-in-leach for the processing and recovery of the gold which averages 92.5% over the life of mine.

Notable recently completed construction works include the mechanical installation of the mill, structural steel assembly, fitting of the feed and ball loading chute, and installation of the gearbox cooling system. Outstanding works include installation of the sump pumps and electrical systems, which are ahead of schedule.

“The project remains on budget and, furthermore, all equipment for the project is now on site, with procurement and logistics teams having successfully coordinated full delivery,” Hummingbird said.

Commissioning of the completed mill is due to start in July with full capacity ore throughput expected in August.

Dan Betts, CEO of Hummingbird, said: “At full capacity, the mine will benefit from economies of scale, with no requirement for additional staff to the second mill, so we therefore look forward to a lowering cost profile with increasing production rates over the life of mine.”

Element Six pits polycrystalline diamond against tungsten carbide at Bauma 2019

Element Six is showcasing a live wear test using a grinding machine at the Bauma exhibition in Munich, this week.

The leader in supermaterials, and part of the De Beers Group, says this will demonstrate the difference in wear rate between polycrystalline diamond (PCD) and tungsten carbide, to showcase the extreme properties of synthetic diamond and the areas in which it can outperform tungsten carbide.

“The test will highlight the potential of PCD as a material to enhance the performance of tools and machines in the construction and mining industries,” the company said.

“The findings from the test will echo Bauma’s own key messages this year around efficiency and sustainability, by proving the ability to significantly improve the performance and safety of machinery.

“Synthetic diamond tools can exceed standard tungsten carbide tool life by 40 times for applications such as road milling, reducing downtime, fuel consumption and machining time, while improving quality and surface finish,” Element Six said.

Speaking at Bauma, Markus Bening, Global Sales Director, Road, Mining & Wear Parts at Element Six, said: “Based on our experience developing synthetic diamond tools for road milling and roof bolting applications, we see huge opportunities for original equipment manufacturers and toolmakers in construction and mining.

“Feedback from end-users in Sweden, where synthetic diamond is today’s standard for road milling jobs, has consistently shown that the benefits can be game-changing in terms of increased machining speeds and productivity.”

He added: “As companies look to embrace forward-thinking concepts like smart drilling and smart mining, longer-lasting tools are at the forefront of their minds. At our booth, we’ll be demonstrating how synthetic diamond and tungsten carbide tools can deliver incredible results in industries seeking the best performance.”

The Element Six booth is located in Hall C3, Booth 536.

Vertimills continue to save energy and cut emissions, Metso says

Metso says its Vertimills® are globally recognised as some of the most energy efficient grinding machines, and the company has tried to make that clear in its 2018 annual report.

Vertimills have proven to grind more efficiently than horizontal ball mills, with typical energy savings of 25-35% and, in some cases, even 50%, according to Metso.

“In addition to grinding efficiency, reduced media consumption, lower installation cost, reduced maintenance, and reduced liner wear make the Metso Vertimill the lowest total cost of ownership option in many applications,” Metso said.

Based on a review of the Vertimills currently in operation and a comparison of their efficiency and media consumption relative to a ball mill, Metso estimates that approximately 1.48 million MWh of energy was saved and 652,000 t of CO2 emissions were abated in 2018, compared with 924,000 MWh of energy and 547,000 t CO2, respectively, in 2017.

Since its introduction in 1979, over 440 Vertimills have been delivered globally.