Tag Archives: Hancock Prospecting

Hancock partners with Uni of Melbourne on ‘game changing’ Carbelec solution

The University of Melbourne has entered into a multi-year partnership agreement with Hancock Prospecting Pty Ltd (HPPL) to develop Carbelec™, a technology that uses electrolysis at low temperature to convert carbon dioxide into reusable carbon and oxygen.

Carbelec is a potential game changer for industries such as steelmaking as it would enable the constant capture and re-use of carbon, balancing ongoing demands for production with the reduction of CO2 emissions in line with government mandates across the globe, the university said.

By capturing and reusing the carbon in a closed cycle, many existing efficient and proven processes will become essentially zero emission. This has the potential to speed-up decarbonisation by removing the challenges of introducing numerous bespoke solutions, according to the university. It is expected that commercial applications of Carbelec would utilise proven renewable energy sources to power the electrolysis process.

The University of Melbourne has successfully demonstrated Carbelec within its laboratories, it said. The partnership with HPPL will enable refinement and then scaling up of Carbelec over a two-stage developmental program.

University of Melbourne’s Dean of Engineering and Information Technology, Professor Mark Cassidy, said: “This partnership will allow University of Melbourne researchers and Hancock Prospecting to establish a comprehensive research and development program which addresses core components to develop this exciting technology. Our aim is to combine our world-leading research expertise with Hancock Prospecting’s ability for real-world practical deployment and, together, develop this technology on an industrial scale.”

Hancock Prospecting Chief Executive Officer, Garry Korte, said the potential benefits of Carbelec should be significant and far-reaching, noting that steelmakers could continue to benefit from the reliable and consistent supply of Pilbara ores, while also achieving their decarbonisation goals with both current and emerging steel technologies.

“Hancock Prospecting’s pioneering spirit is backed by a strong history of successfully partnering in innovative solutions to meet the needs of customers,” he said. “We believe Carbelec can be an important part of a future low-cost energy mix, allowing industries such as steel, cement and even current day baseload power generators to continue to lift the living standards of people in Australia and worldwide.”

MACA to carry out open-pit mining services at Roy Hill iron ore operation

MACA Ltd says it has been awarded a mining services contract with Roy Hill Iron Ore Pty Ltd at the Roy Hill iron ore operation in the Pilbara of Western Australia.

The project consists of open-pit mining services, including load and haul and drill and blast, and is expected to generate approximately A$70 million ($50 million) in revenue for MACA over the 12-month term, commencing in early 2022, it said.

MACA says its work in hand position including this contract is currently A$3 billion.

The Roy Hill project is owned by Hancock Prospecting Pty Ltd, Marubeni Corporation, POSCO and China Steel Corporation, and is 115 km north of Newman in Western Australia’s Pilbara region.

MACA CEO, Mike Sutton, said: “MACA is very pleased to be able to continue working with Roy Hill at its world-class iron ore operation, having commenced civil works at the project earlier this year. Our team has a long-standing relationship with Roy Hill, starting with first mining at the Roy Hill project, and MACA is proud to be an ongoing part of this operation.

“This project will be undertaken utilising existing fleet, contributes to MACA’s secured mining work in hand for financial year 2022 and financial year 2023 and further secures our strong position in the Pilbara region.”

Hancock, Mineral Resources and Roy Hill consider Australia-first infrastructure sharing pact

Hancock Prospecting Pty Ltd and Mineral Resources Ltd have entered into a legally binding agreement under which they will jointly investigate the potential to develop a new iron ore export facility at Port Hedland’s Stanley Point berth 3 in South West Creek.

The agreement would see Roy Hill Holdings, a Hancock subsidiary, provide services to both MRL and Hancock for development and operation of the project, including rail haulage and port services.

MRL said: “The project aligns with MRL’s strategy to unlock stranded deposits in the Pilbara by developing pit-to-port solutions and expanding its capability to be a long-term, low-cost sustainable supplier of iron ore to international markets.”

Hancock and MRL will conduct an expedited study to assess the economic and technical feasibility of the proposed project in the coming months, to usual market standards, they said.

In addition, Hancock and MRL will seek to undertake discussions with the Government of Western Australia and the Pilbara Ports Authority (PPA) in relation to the potential project. It is acknowledged that in order for the proposed project to proceed, the parties would need to first receive a development approval and a capacity allocation for the project from the PPA to jointly develop and operate Stanley Point berth 3 and other associated supporting port infrastructure.

MRL Managing Director, Chris Ellison (pictured in shot with Hancock Prospecting Executive Chair, Gina Rinehart on screen), said this partnership and infrastructure sharing proposal is the first-of-its-kind in the Australian resources industry and would enable significant value to be unlocked for the company in a sustainable manner.

“Our long-stated strategy is to transition from short-life, high-cost mines to lower-cost, long-life operations underpinned by innovative infrastructure solutions,” he said. “Developing our stranded assets will provide additional growth for MRL’s unique mining services build-own-operate model.”

The project  will be subject to a final investment decision by both parties, and other necessary approvals and agreements (including a lease, licence and an infrastructure development agreement or similar) from the PPA on agreed terms.

Sanjiv Ridge heads for full operations after Atlas Iron crushes first milestone

Atlas Iron has announced first ore has been crushed at its new mine, Sanjiv Ridge, in Western Australia, ahead of schedule.

Sanjiv Ridge is set to provide a significant boost to Atlas’s annual output, with an expected 4-5 Mt/y of lump and fines to be hauled by road to the Utah Point stockyard at Port Hedland. It is expected the mine will add 5-6 years to the Atlas value chain, with 64 Mt at 57.2% Fe of mineral resources and 29 Mt at 57% Fe reserves.

On the crushing milestone, Atlas Iron CEO, Sanjiv Manchanda, said: “Congratulations to all our team members, including both Atlas Iron staff and our valued contractors, for their hard work and dedication to hit this target ahead of schedule. Now, with first ore crushed, we are focusing on building the product stockpile and commencement of road haulage.”

Sanjiv Ridge was recently renamed from Corunna Downs after Atlas’ CEO in recognition of his long service across the Hancock Prospecting Group of companies.

The new mine site is due to be in full operation in the third quarter of Atlas’ 2021 financial year, and is situated northeast of Atlas Iron’s existing mining operation, Mount Webber.

Minprovise keeps crushing on track at Hope Downs 1 iron ore mine

Minprovise says it has completed a jaw crusher replacement project at Rio Tinto and Hancock Prospecting’s jointly owned Hope Downs 1 iron ore mine site in the Pilbara of Western Australia.

The crusher in question, a Metso Nordberg C160, is Hope Downs’ primary crusher. Minprovise was selected for this project due to the positive references it has previously received carrying out similar work in the field, the mineral processing equipment and site services provider said.

The crusher replacement was the second such project completed in the last year by Minprovise, the first being undertaken at the West Angelas mine site (part of the Rio-majority owned Robe River joint venture), located in Newman, in late 2018.

Hope Downs 1 is part of the Hope Downs joint venture. The Hope Downs 1 and 4 deposits produced 46.9 Mt of iron ore in 2017, according to Rio.

“The large-scale site maintenance project required careful quality control and site safety management in the lead up to, and during, the crusher replacement,” Minprovise said. The team were required to safely and efficiently remove the old jaw crusher model and replace it with the newer C160 model in its already established and confined structure, according to the company.

“Minprovise’s end-to-end business model and internal manufacture and fabrication capabilities meant that the team were also able to fabricate the appropriate and tailormade transport frames, jigs and chute covers for the optimised safety of the project,” it said.

To complete the lift, the company used a 500 t crane to safely manoeuvre the 78 t crusher mainframe into place.

As the sole provider of the install process, Minprovise was required to coordinate between the client, the transport agency, the crane provider and the crusher manufacturer to ensure a smooth and time efficient process, it said. “Minprovise’s phase of the replacement project was completed in the originally quoted and designated amount of time, with no hiccups or costly time-delays.”

The fabrication and install of the crushers casting plates to take the full impact of the crushers vibrations was also undertaken by Minprovise employees.

Throughout the entire process – which included concrete cutting and jackhammering of the support base, removal and replacement of the casting plates, re-grouting of the new base and plates and heavy lift and install of the crusher – zero safety incidents or minor injuries were reported, according to the company.