Tag Archives: Terex

K92 Mining continues to add new equipment at expanding Kainantu gold mine

K92 Mining, despite the onset of COVID-19, has made significant progress on its plans to increase production at its Kainantu gold mine in Papua New Guinea.

In March 2020, Kainantu achieved a major milestone, commencing the first long hole stope using the modified AVOCA method. This method is ideal for narrow vein/lens higher-grade stopes and can provide higher tonnages through continuous fill and blasting, as well as improved dilution control, according to the company.

The commencement of this new mining method is significant since previous mining has been exclusively from lower productivity and higher-cost development and cut and fill stoping, K92 said.

The first stope was from the K1 Vein and, to date, long hole stoping activities have performed in-line with design and have been increasing, providing a notable positive impact on operational flexibility, the company added.

Mining operations, which have been expanding in line with the 2019 decision to expand throughput to 400,000 t/y, from 200,000 t/y, have also benefited from further additions to the mining fleet.

The Papua New Guinea COVID-19 State of Emergency declared on March 20, 2020, saw limited impact to freight, with the arrival of a third Sandvik LH517i underground LHD loader with AutoMine® capabilities, a third CAT AD45B 45 t underground truck and two Terex Articulated surface haul trucks, since its declaration. The Government of Papua New Guinea ended the COVID-19 State of Emergency on June 16, resulting in a further easing of some of the restrictions, particularly around domestic movement.

“The equipment joins a significantly expanded and modernised fleet since the decision to proceed with the Stage 2 Expansion on March 13, 2019,” K92 said.

Back in January, the company said it expected a Sandvik DS421 cable bolter to arrive this quarter, alongside a modular batching plant. The company said earlier this month that this unit (pictured), as well as three new and high powered diamond drill rigs were in transit to the mine.

Twin incline activities have recently recommenced at Kainantu with the easing of restrictions from the state of emergency. Ground support for the portal is also underway, with portalling and the installation of steel sets expected to commence in the first half of the September quarter, the company said.

The process plant, meanwhile, has achieved multiple daily throughput records during the June quarter, significantly exceeding the 200,000 t/y, or circa-550 t/d nameplate capacity, with over 700 t/d achieved on multiple occasions.

“The strong performance of the process plant and underground mine to date are expected to result in gold-equivalent production exceeding March quarter output,” the company said.

The March quarter saw K92 produce 19,240 oz of gold, 339,993 lb (154 t) of copper and 6,937 oz of silver for a total of 19,934 gold-equivalent ounces, representing the second highest quarter on record. Gold-equivalent production in 2019 was 82,256 oz, with 115,000-125,000 oz of gold-equivalent scheduled in 2020.

Preparations are also being made to recommence Stage 2 process plant commissioning in the near term, to double plant throughput capacity to 400,000 t/y. All the equipment is installed, and commissioning is expected to commence in first half of the September quarter, with completion targeted at the end of that three-month period, K92 said.

John Lewins, K92 Chief Executive Officer and Director, added that a Stage 3 Expansion preliminary economic assessment is planned for July.

Terex ups its bulk handling capability with ProStack launch

Terex has launched a new range of products to, it says, address the needs of the bulk material handling and product stockpiling industries.

The new ProStack range has been designed for key markets and applications including aggregates, mining, recycling, agriculture, ports and terminals, and many other bulk material handling industries, it said.

Steven Aiken, Global Product Line Director of ProStack, says ProStack is a tailored range of mobile bulk handling solutions, which includes feeders, telescopic conveyors and truck unloaders.

“These products have been specifically developed and built for large port and larger-scale bulk handling environments,” he said.

The company sees an opportunity through ProStack to bring value to customers in these industries by providing high-performance equipment that is simple to operate and maintain, automated during operation and requiring minimal setup time, it said.

“High performance is at the heart of the brand and, as new products are developed, the focus will be on moving the most amount of material, cost effectively in the shortest time possible,” the company said.

Aitken added: “We want to provide high capacity, intelligent machines to the bulk handling market.”

ProStack enhances the existing core range of conveyors sold by Terex dealers globally.

“Regardless of the type of job, mobile conveyors can improve safety by reducing traffic levels on site and save customers money by eliminating the double handling of material, coupled with low operating and maintenance costs,” Terex said.

The ProStack launch portfolio consists of a Bulk Reception Feeder Range, the Hornets (pictured), and a Telescopic Conveyor Range, the Telsons, both designed to include a multitude of options that tailor these machines to meet customer demand.

The Bulk Reception Feeders can receive high volume material feeds, delivering uniformed material flow onto secondary material handling systems. The 10-12 feeder has a 1,200 mm wide belt design that can handle up to 1,000 t/h and discharge the material at a maximum height of 3.1 m, according to the company. The larger 15-18 feeder has an 1,800 mm belt and can handle 1,500 t/h discharging at a height of 3.5 m.

The range of radial telescopic conveyors, the Telsons, are available from 42 m up to 58 m in length with capacities up to 1,500 t/h in standard specification. They come in a portable wheeled format and are enhanced with on-board hydraulic systems to allow for quick, efficient site deployment. Advanced PLC automation and radio remote control of the radial, telescopic and luffing movements, meanwhile, allow creation of large precise desegregated stockpiles, loading material carrying vessels, barges and ships or being integrated into existing bulk handling operations, the company said.

ProStack products will be manufactured in existing MP Centers of Excellence in Northern Ireland, with additional support and service from facilities in North America and India, Terex said.

“We look forward to adding more products to the portfolio in 2020 and serving our new customers to a very high standard,” Aiken concluded.

Mine automation starting to take hold, RFC Ambrian says

In its second report in a series on innovation and new technology in the mining industry, RFC Ambrian has tackled the subject of autonomous mining equipment, which, the authors say, has reached an “important level of maturity”.

The report considered both surface and underground equipment, but most notably surface mine haulage trucks where there has been an area of significant focus for major mining companies.

As the authors said: “This has reached an important level of maturity, although it is still evolving and its penetration across the industry is still in its infancy.”

AHS

The Autonomous Haulage Systems (AHS) have evolved from improvements in GPS for positioning and navigation, developments in sensors and detection –particularly radar and LiDAR, improved computing power and on-board monitoring, faster and more reliable networks and internet connection, and the development of effective and accurate algorithms and software, the authors said.

“AHS has appeared , first, at large mine operations where the benefits have the largest impacts, due to the high component of fixed costs in an AHS operation, and in developed countries where there is a shortage of skilled workers and labour costs are higher,” they said.

Outlining the potential benefits of AHS is straightforward, but finding hard data to support it is more difficult, according to the authors.

“Companies have made suggestions about the scale of improvement, but they are light on detail, definitions are not clear, and the data varies between companies,” the authors said.

Suggested improvements in productivity have come from Caterpillar (15-20%), Fortescue Metals Group (30%), Komatsu (15%), and Rio Tinto (15%), according to the authors.

“These improvements are still meaningful, and corporate companies would argue that every mine is different and that the mining companies and original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) that have so far implemented AHS have the right to guard this proprietary information and hold on to the competitive advantage,” the authors said.

Autonomy in other surface equipment

The authors said they are also now seeing this same technology used to automate other operations in the surface mine. This includes drill rigs, dozers, loaders and ancillary equipment.

“Much of this equipment is currently, at best, semi-autonomous, although a few mines have implemented fully-autonomous drill rigs and dozers,” they noted.

“Moving this equipment to full autonomy offers significant production improvements, although the scale of actual savings is not likely to be as great as those achieved with AHS,” the authors said.

“However, we have not yet seen quantified the downstream benefits of the resultant improved drilling and blasting.

“The automation of earth moving machines provides another step to increased productivity within the mine. However, loaders face additional challenges as a result of the variability of the loading face and the risk of collisions with the haulage trucks.”

Due to the complex nature of the bucket-media interaction, developing automatic loading functions that are better than or equal to expert manual drivers with regard to performance is a highly difficult task, according to the authors.

“As a result, fully-autonomous loading is not yet commercially available. Some observers suggest that the implementation of fully-autonomous surface loading is still some five years away, while others believe that full automation is unlikely.”

Underground mining

When it comes to underground mining, the authors of the report said, as with surface mining, full autonomy remains the goal.

“Mining companies and contractors are constantly looking to use technological developments to better utilise their investment in equipment and human resources and improve safety,” the authors said. “Particular features of traditional underground mines are: long unproductive periods caused by re-entry times required for operators after blasting; and higher health and safety risks due to geotechnical and environmental challenges.

“The use of autonomy underground aims to increase the productivity of the equipment and improve the safety of the operators.”

While the aims remain the same, full autonomy in the underground mine is not as advanced as in the surface mine, according to the authors.

“Haul trucks are used less frequently in underground mines, although a few mines are using haul trucks with AHS. More underground mines perform a short cycle of loading, hauling and dumping from a draw point to a tipping point with LHD equipment.

“Implementation of autonomous systems underground for LHDs is occurring, however, as with surface loading, one of the major hurdles to automating LHDs is replacing human judgement required for filling the bucket.”

This has seen full autonomy being used for the hauling and dumping cycle, but semi-autonomy usually used for loading, according to the authors. “Successful trials of fully- autonomous LHDs have been achieved and Sandvik i-series now offers an automated bucket filling assistant as a standard function,” they said.

Underground drilling operations, meanwhile, are achieving increased levels of autonomy but are also presently only semi-autonomous.

Robotic rail operations

The authors then looked at autonomous rail haulage systems, a segment of the market that has gained in prominence in the past few years thanks to initiatives such as Rio Tinto’s AutoHaul in the Pilbara of Western Australia.

The authors said: “There has been some form of automation on worldwide metro systems for many years, but one area where autonomous technology has yet to gain a foothold is rail freight. Trials are underway in Holland and Germany but implementing autonomous train driving on a complex rail network, with passenger trains and freight trains, is more difficult than on a metro system.”

The one exception to this is in the mining sector and AutoHaul, they said, where Rio has completed commissioning of the world’s first fully-autonomous, long distance, heavy-haul rail network which is now in full operation.

Pace of implementation

Despite the acclaimed success and the relative level of maturity of the technology, the wider implementation of AHS does not appear to be happening very fast, the authors argue.

“The systems of both the two main suppliers (Caterpillar and Komatsu) are well proven and have delivered positive results, although, according to consultants, both systems also have examples of less-than-expected performance.

“Nevertheless, the technical issues appear relatively minor and there is interest right across the industry but, in spite of the potentially significant benefits, more mines are not now using AHS.”

There are a number of likely reasons for this, the authors said, explaining that one of the most important is a lack of skilled personnel.

“We believe there is a lack of in-depth knowledge of the technology and limited personnel with the requisite experience, skills, and training throughout the industry’s hierarchy,” they said.

“Further, there is a shortage of skilled autonomous operators, developers, and consultants, some of who are moving to the autonomous auto market.”

Important factors in the success of AHS appear to be the level of management commitment, planning, and focus in the implementation, with the best results reported from well-operated mining sites, the authors said.

“Another factor is likely to be limitations on equipment supply from OEMs for new equipment and truck conversions, either due to manufacturing backlogs or maybe market caution, limiting investment. This is allowing the OEMs to be more selective in their customers.”

The authors cautioned: “However, if the existing suppliers do not develop additional capacity quick enough this could create opportunities for additional entrants in to the market.”

Capital availability in the mining industry could also be an issue holding back AHS advancement, they said, although it is less tight than it has been in recent years.

“Certainly, some lower-margin operations might struggle to finance the capital, although the uplift in relative profitability could be transformational, with relatively quick paybacks,” they said.
And the historical conservatism of the mining industry is also likely to be a factor, the authors said.

“There is still a natural reluctance within the industry to adopt new or unproven technology due to the high capital cost involved and the potential operational and reputational risks involved.

“This will be compounded if the organisation has limited experience and limited access to the technology.”

You can read the full report here.

Magna MA04+ radial tyres make the cut in South Africa coal mine

Magna Tyres has continued its good form in the Africa mining sector, securing the custom of another big mining contractor that has employed its 27.00R49 Magna MA04+ radial tyres on Terex rigid dump trucks working at a coal mine in South Africa.

These tyres are available in various compounds including standard, cut- and heat resistant.

In October, one of the largest mining contractors in the world operating in Africa’s largest coal mine selected 40.00R57 Magna MA04+C Giant tyres for its Cat 793D rigid dump trucks.

“Due to Magna’s proven track record regarding premium quality Giant tyres, this customer has decided to work with Magna and now benefits from increased productivity and reduced operating costs per hour,” Magna said, adding that the customer first used the Magna MB440 Bias but eventually chose the MA04+ radial tyres.

“The all-steel radial constructed tyres especially designed for coal applications are extremely suitable to the serve conditions in which they are used,” the company said. “The deep aggressive E4 pattern and excellent resistance to sidewall damages makes this Giant tyre extremely durable. The customer is very pleased with the overall performance of the premium quality tyres.”

Magna MA04+ is designed and constructed based on the latest Magna radial tyre technology. The casing reduces heat building inside the tyre, resulting in lower fuel consumption, higher efficiency, optimised operator comfort and prolonged service life, according to the company. Additionally, the tyre offers outstanding puncture resistance compared to less-durable cross-ply tyres, leading to a low cost price per hour, it said.

Terex TA400 ADTs stand up to Indonesia coal mine test

Ten Terex TA400 articulated haul trucks have been proving their worth removing overburden from a coal mine in East Kalimantan, Indonesia.

The trucks are being used by local mine owner PT Tambang Berkat Karunia for a five-year project in Batuah.

“We have the machines working for up to 18 hours a day, removing overburden and transporting it across the soft terrain,” said Bhisma Dian Resnadi, Operation Manager for PT Berkarya Abadi Selalu, a subsidiary of TBK tasked with undertaking the work.

The Terex Trucks TA400 is perfectly suited to perform in large-scale construction projects, quarries and mine sites, according to Terex. With a maximum payload of 38 t, TBK’s 10 TA400s can collectively haul 380 t, which is equivalent to the weight of around 70 Asian elephants.

“With the ground being so soft at the Batuah mine, we needed trucks that could perform in challenging conditions – and TBK’s TA400 haulers enable us to do just that,” Bhisma said. “Some of our operators had never used a TA400 before. They’ve said that they are very impressed with the performance features – especially the engine – as well as how advanced the technology is.”

Established in 2018, TBK is still relatively new to the industry. It purchased the Terex Trucks haulers from PT United Equipment Indonesia, the official Terex Trucks dealer in Indonesia since 2009.

Bhisma said: “We decided to go with Terex Trucks machines because they are known for being strong and reliable. Price factored into our decision, too. Given the quality of the TA400, the cost is very reasonable. As the project progresses, we might decide to purchase additional Terex Trucks haulers.”

The TA400 is powered by a six-cylinder Scania DC13 engine that is both fuel efficient and delivers low cost of operation, Terex says. It also comes fitted with a modulating transmission retarder, teamed with an efficient exhaust brake and fully enclosed oil-cooled multi-disc brakes, resulting in optimum control and increased safety.

In addition to this, all three axles are in permanent (6 x 6) all-wheel drive, which enables the TA400 to achieve great traction with minimal driveline impact and wheel spin. This results in reduced tyre wear.

To ensure servicing the TA400 is quick and easy, it comes with ground level test points and a fully tilting cab, as well as an electronically raised hood, which also results in reduced downtime.