Tag Archives: mining engines

Cummins’ PrevenTech Mining keeps Komatsu trucks, wheel loaders going at Boliden mines

Cummins says its solutions are helping maximise machine uptime on trucks and wheel loaders running its engines at Boliden’s mines in Sweden and Finland.

In the vast open-pit copper mines here, the temperatures can drop as low as -40°C, testing the sturdiest of machinery working day and night extracting and hauling ore.

“It wouldn’t be so tough on the equipment if the thermometer stayed in roughly the same place for any decent length of time, but up there on the edge of the Arctic Circle it’s not unusual for a bitingly cold day to be followed by a more temperate one that feels positively tropical by comparison,” Cummins says.

The unpredictable swing in temperatures makes it difficult to keep equipment in full working order, with parts freezing and thawing, but it’s a challenge taken on by Cummins, which has signed service and maintenance agreements with the Swedish and Finnish distributors of Komatsu specialist mining equipment.

Cost-per-hour agreements – the first of their kind for Cummins in Europe – cover a total of 17 QSK60 Tier 4 Final engine-powered vehicles in Finland, while, in Sweden, a support contract covers a further nine examples of Komatsu’s 2,700 hp 930-E dump truck and a pair of the world’s largest wheel loaders, the L2350.

European DBU leader, Alok Joshi, and Sander Thorstensen, Cummins Leader for the Nordic region, arranged the contracts with the Komatsu distributors Hesselberg (Sweden) and SRO (Finland).

“We are relatively new to the mining sector in Europe,” Thorstensen says, “but all the feedback we have received so far has been incredibly positive, helped by our outstanding new PrevenTech® Mining telematics technology.”

PrevenTech Mining is a real-time digital monitoring and reporting system that provides an early warning of potential equipment operating issues. It helps plan maintenance and service, ensuring machinery is offline as little as possible, boosting productivity for, in this case, Boliden.

Janne Valmari is managing the Komatsu operations for Cummins Sweden. He has appointed two dedicated service technicians for Boliden’s Aitik copper mine just south of Gällivare in northern Sweden, and four technicians to cover Boliden’s Kevitsa mining operations across the border in Finland.

Valmari said the stream of data from PrevenTech allows the Cummins technicians to identify and diagnose performance issues faster and with greater accuracy, so they can see, for example, if an engine has been idling too long or revved too high, and can plan in the right fixes.

“It puts the mine owner in complete control, with no expensive surprises and benefitting from a higher return on their investment in product,” Valmari says.

Thorstensen added: “With their goal of keeping production running non-stop round-the-clock, I am certain Boliden sees the Komatsu-Cummins relationship as a core element of its strategy, and we will continue to strengthen our ties with Boliden and the Nordic mining industry in general.”

This is an edited version of an article that appeared in The Cummins Magazine

Rolls-Royce mtu Aiken facility to offer engine remanufacturing capabilities

Rolls-Royce has announced a $17.4 million investment at its mtu Aiken manufacturing facility in Graniteville, South Carolina, USA, for the addition of a new Remanufacturing and Overhaul Regional Center.

The planned 109,000-sq.ft (10,126 sq.m) expansion project will provide dedicated and streamlined remanufacturing and overhaul operations to support growth based on customer demand, it said. It will also result in the addition of about 20 new jobs.

To be built next to the mtu Aiken plant’s existing engine manufacturing operations, the new centre will bring currently outsourced workshop and warehouse operations in-house and expand them to provide remanufacturing of mtu Series 2000 and 4000 engines and components, the overhaul of mtu brand and customer-owned engines, plus internal and external rework services to help customers and distributors fine-tune maintenance and performance metrics, the company said.

Construction of the new centre is scheduled to begin later this year, with operations expected to begin in early 2023.

“Remanufacturing offers a wise lifecycle investment for customers, returning equipment to like-new condition and resulting in lower acquisition, maintenance and operation costs,” Rolls-Royce said. “Already performed at select global plant locations, the Rolls-Royce remanufacturing and overhaul process is designed to ensure optimal performance and durability, where used engines and assemblies are fully disassembled, cleaned and inspected, and then reworked and reassembled using all new parts to replace any outdated, worn, or damaged components.”

Dr Otto Preiss, Chief Operating Officer at Rolls-Royce Power Systems, said: “Investing in a remanufacturing and overhaul centre in the US is the next milestone in implementing our global strategy to optimise the value of our installed base, with regional centres and supporting workshops offering the best support for our customers.”

Marc Goldschmidt, Global Vice President Remanufacturing and Overhaul, added: “The new centre will fulfill regional and local customer needs using the global network and processes, following the remanufacturing and overhaul Lead Plant located in Magdeburg, Germany.”

The facility at Aiken will feature distinct work areas to carry out the remanufacturing and overhaul process: core management; cleaning and disassembly; measuring and inspection; rework; reassembly; test; and painting and packaging. Upon start-up, the centre will remanufacture all applications of mtu Series 2000, Series 4000, and Detroit Diesel 2-Cycle engines. The future aim is to add capabilities to support the company’s sustainable solutions such as battery containers, along with natural gas engines and systems.

Steve Blaszczak, Senior Manager, Remanufacturing and Overhaul – US, said: “Our investment in remanufacturing and overhaul solutions is also in line with our initiatives toward more environmentally-friendly solutions. By remanufacturing and overhauling engines, we are able to extend their useful life while also bringing them to the latest emissions standards. This benefits our customers as well as the environment.”

Since its opening in the fall of 2010, the mtu Aiken Plant has continued to innovate, invest and expand, the company said.

“What began with the production of Series 2000 and Series 4000 engines, has grown to include the assembly of military engines, the machining of parts and even the production of energy through its solar field and microgrid,” it said. “With an on-site research and development centre and now a new Remanufacturing and Overhaul Center, the mtu Aiken Plant covers the full circle of life for an mtu engine – from concept to second life (ie overhaul).”

Cummins launches QSK95 engine for ultra-class mining trucks

Cummins has launched the high horsepower QSK95 95 litre engine for mining, heralding it as the most powerful engine ever to be developed for ultra-class trucks.

Already in use in the marine and rail sectors, the mining engine comes with 2,837-3,281 kW of power (two versions – the higher rated QSK95 4400 and the QSK95 3800), 15,245-17,653 Nm of torque and is available in US EPA Tier 2 and Tier 4 Final configurations.

“The QSK95 offers class-leading cost of production and performance, with the availability that comes with legendary Cummins reliability,” the company said. Cummins has sold more than 1,200 of these engines across 36 different countries, it added.

IM understands the engine is being trialled in trucks like the 363 t Komatsu 980Es working at high altitudes in Latin America, with potential to be deployed in ultra-class trucks working in similar environments from other OEMs.

Cummins says the QSK95 delivers an “optimum power-to-weight ratio for 400 t (363 tonne) haul trucks”, a 3,800 hp rating for increased fuel efficiency and, on average, a 15% better life to overhaul, leading to longer engine lifespan with fewer overhauls.

“Specially designed single-stage turbocharging system means the QSK95 reliably maintains big power, even at high altitudes”, Cummins said. It also comes with lower vibration and less noise, thanks to the simple compact V16 design and stiff engine block.

Cummins power units set for take off

Cummins has launched new engine power take-off (PTO) capabilities for its B6.7 and L9 Performance Series Power Units that could help support underground mining equipment, as well as crushing and screening units.

Launched at Hillhead 2018, Cummins’ power units are available from 75-503 kW, and delivered as a complete and ready-made package. This comprises an engine, exhaust after-treatment system, radiator, and cooling system, plus auxiliaries such as mounting feet, hoses and an air cleaner.

More than 60% of the content is pre-approved, making the machine integration process simpler and quicker, according to the company.

Jeremy Harsin – Cummins Off-Highway Marketing Director – said: “Our Performance Series power units offer a flexible drop-in solution for manufacturers. The high-power density of our engines enables them to deliver high machine capability for hard-working applications such as crushing, screening and pumping.”

Examples of installations to date include the L9 Power Units powering Anaconda Equipment International’s new J12 and I12 mobile crushing machines.

“To increase the flexibility and capability of the power units, we are integrating new single and dual rear-engine power take-offs (REPTO),” Harsin said. “These complement their standard PTO capability used for items such as hydraulic pumps. We are also making these available on the base engines without the pack.”

As an example, fitted with the dual REPTO, the L9 will have a total drive capability of 560 Nm. This will make the engine capable of driving additional pumping capability through SAE B 2 and 4 bolt mounts, according to the company. Integrated into the flywheel housing, the dual REPTO is compact and has a minimal impact on engine packaging. Added weight is around 100 kg.

“For equipment manufacturers, they have the ability to efficiently drive more from the engine without the need for additional aftermarket systems,” Harsin explained. “This would support driving of hydraulic pumps for all sorts of machine functions from steering systems to fans, etc. It will reduce installation costs and complexity, for a more integrated solution.”

Babylon Pump’s business development efforts power up

Babylon Pump & Power Ltd has entered into a conditional agreement for the acquisition of diesel engine specialist Primepower Queensland for up to A$4.2 million ($2.9 million) in cash, shares, delayed performance payments and assumption of debt.

Mackay-based Primepower was founded in 2004 and is a specialist in Cummins engine repairs and rebuilds to the Queensland resources sector, Babylon said, with the acquisition complementing Babylon’s Western Australia-based diesel maintenance division and diesel generated power and pumping rental business.

The company has grown into a highly regarded specialist provider of diesel maintenance to the resources sector with a client base including Peabody, Fortescue Metals Group, BHP Mitsubishi Alliance, Anglo American, Wesfarmers and Minerva, Babylon said. Primepower generated unaudited annual revenue of around A$9.1 million for the year to June 30, 2019, and adjusted net profit of some A$600,000.

“The acquisition is Babylon’s first move into the eastern states and forms part of the company’s growth strategy, and provides an ideal platform to expand Babylon’s successful specialty equipment rental business into the East Coast,” Babylon said.

The acquisition provides Babylon’s Diesel Maintenance division with extra scale, in addition to technical expertise in Cummins engines to complement its expertise in Caterpillar engines, Babylon Executive Chairman, Michael Shelby, said. “[It] will be the perfect springboard to introduce our power and pumping rental offering to the East Coast market,” Shelby said. “The acquisition also provides commodity diversity, exposure to a larger client base, many with national operations, and will deliver a step-change in our operating scale and revenue.”

Shelby hinted that this may not prove to be the end of the company’s M&A efforts.

“The resource services and related sectors remain very fragmented, and it has become apparent that there are a number further potential complimentary acquisitions and new business development opportunities available,” he said. “While focusing on its core business, it is Babylon’s intention to explore thoroughly opportunities to expand in conjunction with its strong organic business growth.”

The consideration is comprised of cash on completion of A$1.7 million (adjusted pro-rata for net assets), A$600,000 in Babylon shares, assumption of a A$500,000 trade finance facility, deferred consideration of A$1 million over two years (adjusted for net asset value), additional deferred consideration of A$500,000 conditional on a revenue requirement of A$8.9 million being met in the 2020 financial year.

The Primepower purchase will see Babylon acquire net assets including stock and work in progress of A$3.1 million, and goodwill and plant and equipment valued at A$1.1 million. As part of the deal, Primepower founder and owner, Michael Donegan, will also remain a Primepower executive for a minimum 12 months.

DEUTZ to supply SANY with China emission-compliant engines

DEUTZ has entered a joint venture agreement with SANY that will see the Germany-based company take over production of the China construction equipment manufacturer’s current engine range.

DEUTZ says it will be investing a mid-double digit million euro amount in the new joint venture and will hold a majority share of 51%. The closing of the transaction is expected by the end of the year. This agreement follows a memorandum of understanding the two companies signed in December last year (pictured).

The JV is aimed at supplying SANY with around 75,000 new engines in 2022, all of which will comply with the China IV emissions standard for off-road applications and China 6 for on-road applications, DEUTZ said.

“In addition to the successful conclusion of the joint venture deal with SANY, other elements of the international growth strategy are also going to plan in China,” DEUTZ said.

These include the strategic alliance with BEINEI to carry out production locally, with the DEUTZ management team overseeing the manufacture of about 20,000 engines for the Asia market in 2022 at a new factory in Tianjin, China. The ramp-up is set for 2020, when around 2,000 to 3,000 engines are to be produced, DEUTZ said.

“Further progress has also been achieved in the partnership between DEUTZ and FAR EAST HORIZON to expand the local service business,” DEUTZ said. “With more than 80 branches, FAR EAST HORIZON is the largest player in China’s construction equipment rental business and the ideal partner to meet the growing demand for innovative engines. DEUTZ customers will soon be able to benefit from digital services such as a shared online shop.”

DEUTZ CEO, Dr Frank Hiller, said: “The joint venture agreement marks an important milestone in the implementation of our new China strategy. We are now ideally positioned to take advantage of the rapid growth in the world’s largest individual market for engines.

“The alliances with our local partners will enable us to significantly increase our local presence for engines and we now have access to an attractive production network that will enable us to efficiently meet customer demand in the region. We can also tap into an extensive service network that we will systematically enhance with digital solutions. In an initial stage, we aim to achieve revenue of around €500 million ($550 million) by 2022.”

DEUTZ said the Chinese engines market has grown steadily in recent years and the uptrend is set to continue for some years to come. “Growth of up to 5% is forecast in China’s construction equipment application segment in 2019, while in material handling it is set to be up to 10%.”

Cummins launches ‘Power Hub’ in Gauteng, South Africa

Cummins has officially launched its new “Power Hub” in the Waterfall Logistics Precinct in Waterfall City, Gauteng, South Africa.

The new premises strategically consolidates and solidifies various business premises in support of the company’s position as Africa’s preferred power solutions provider, Cummins said.

The 15,355 m² facility, a ZAR350 million ($24 million) investment, houses the Cummins Southern Africa Regional Headquarters, the Master Rebuild Centre (MRC), Africa Learning Centre and Gauteng Operations.

The launch, this week, heralds the completion of a three-year project that culminated in the creation of a world-class sales and service facility, Cummins said.

“The new premises are geared to ensure ease of business dealings for customers and support of the Cummins vision of exceeding customer expectations whilst improving operational efficiencies in a collaborative manner,” the company said.

Racheal Njoroge, Managing Director of Southern Africa for Cummins, said: “We are extremely excited to officially launch our new state-of-the-art facilities. The architectural layout has been optimally and uniquely designed, adopting the Cummins Smart Office Concept (CSO) to create a space that enhances internal collaboration, encourages engagement and thereby accelerates a solution-orientated approach.”

The company has relocated from the Kelvin and Longmeadow offices to the Waterfall Logistics Precinct, positioning it “at the epicentre of Gauteng’s most dynamic and strategically located business hub”, Cummins said.

The central hub, providing power solutions for customers across the Southern Africa region, brings together a host of Cummins technically advanced expertise from mining, power systems, automotive and technical training.

Additionally, the facility provides the latest cutting-edge technology to meet industry needs: a 3,500 hp AVL Dyno Test Cell that will trial some of Cummins largest engines to full power; a precision-driven spray booth large enough to accommodate the most powerful Cummins engines’ paint applications and an environmentally advanced water purification plant, an efficient waste water treatment system which recycles 80% of water used in the MRC.

The Power Hub also launches new progressive build processes that substantially reduce the overall build time while improving quality output, Cummins said. The facility, being a part of the Cummins Distribution Business Unit, also focuses on sales and aftermarket servicing.

“The MRC continues to be a focal point of Cummins support to the mining industry, providing rebuilt engines to ensure customers can enjoy a reliable and consistent supply of engines for uninterrupted operations,” Cummins said.

DEUTZ to add hydrogen engines to zero-emission vehicles blueprint

DEUTZ AG and Munich-based start-up KEYOU have agreed to build on their existing partnership and jointly develop commercially viable carbon-neutral hydrogen engines for off-road and on-road applications.

The letter of intent, which will also include hydrogen engines for power generation, could see the two firms bring these engines to production readiness.

Underground mining equipment manufacturers such as GHH Fahrzeuge use DEUTZ engines in their LHDs.

DEUTZ said: “As a leading global manufacturer of innovative drive systems, DEUTZ is seeking to play a pioneering role in the development of high-quality, eco-friendly and efficient engines.

“Alongside the E-DEUTZ strategy, which launched last year and has been pursued with purpose ever since, the collaboration with KEYOU represents a further step forward in the advancement of alternative drive technologies and fuels.”

DEUTZ CEO, Dr Frank Hiller, said: “The use of alternative fuels such as hydrogen is growing in importance. We believe that this drive solution will be a valuable addition to our electrification strategy and play an integral role in the zero-emission vehicles of the future.”

By working on the development of a hydrogen combustion engine, DEUTZ is also offering an alternative to fuel-cell technology, it said. The company’s expertise in combustion engines is being combined with KEYOU-inside technology, which can convert conventional production engines to run on hydrogen. “The technology is extremely scalable, both for on-road and off-road applications, and it can be used in a range of hybrid configurations, including in combination with electric drives,” DEUTZ said.

KEYOU has developed a prototype for its KEYOU-inside technology that can turn a conventional diesel engine into a drive based on state-of-the-art hydrogen technology, according to DEUTZ.

DEUTZ provided support as a development partner, supplying the engine – one of its standard six-cylinder models – and sharing its engineering expertise. The resulting hydrogen combustion engine is extremely cost-efficient, which makes it an attractive alternative to electric drives, fuel-cell drives and other zero-emission systems, the company said.

KEYOU’s first 7.8-litre prototype DEUTZ engine was unveiled to the public in 2018 at the Bauma China trade fair and will also be showcased in April 2019 at the Bauma fair in Munich, Germany.

Specific pilot projects with vehicle manufacturers and end users are in the planning stage, with the appearance of the first prototype vehicles expected in the first half of 2020. The aim is to bring them to production readiness by 2021/22.

Alvaro Sousa, CTO of KEYOU, said: “Our new KEYOU-inside H2 combustion technology is not only cost-efficient, robust and powerful, but it is also perfect for use with DEUTZ engines thanks to its high degree of scalability.”