Tag Archives: Nordberg

Metso Outotec introduces new ’Xtreme’ crusher head for Nordberg cone crushers

Metso Outotec has introduced a new crusher head to complete the portfolio for its Nordberg® MP800, MP1000, MP1250, HP800 and HP900 series of cone crushers.

The Xtreme (forged) head is the most robust head on the market, designed to handle the most demanding applications, according to the company.

Chad Smallwood, SVP Crushing Products at Metso Outotec, said: “Metso Outotec now has a complete range of crusher heads in the portfolio and our customers can choose the level of durability based on their application and needs. The new Xtreme forged head is the most reliable crusher head in the industry. The OEM design ensures optimal crushing even where equipment may be pushed beyond design limits.”

The new Xtreme head provides customers with an option for the most extreme conditions. The Xtreme head complements the Enhanced (heavy duty) head and the Elect (traditional cast) head in this range of crusher heads, Metso Outotec says.

The customer can match their price point and duty level to get the most life out of their components, according to the company. Maximising and extending the life of the components allows for a more sustainable operation overall.

Key benefits of the Xtreme head include:

  • Advanced geometrical features to assure consistent bearing loading within machine design parameters;
  • Complete one-piece forged material;
  • A sustainable design and capabilities to provide safe and reliable operations; and
  • Offers a three-year warranty.

SIMPEC awarded significant Cloudbreak crusher contract from Fortescue

SIMPEC’s relationship with Fortescue Metals Group continues to strengthen, with the engineering contractor set to replace two Metso Outotec Nordberg® C160 jaw crushers at the miner’s Cloudbreak iron ore operation in the Pilbara of Western Australia.

The WestStar Industrial Ltd subsidiary’s new contract for the Hopper 5 Jaw Crusher Replacement project is the first win directly from Fortescue but is far from the first time the company has stepped on site at one of its mines. SIMPEC has previously carried out work on its operations after being subcontracted by the likes of Central Systems, Energy Power Systems, ATCO and others.

The scope of the jaw crusher contract includes removal of all structural and mechanical items required to access the jaw crushers, followed by reinstatement on completion of the change out. It also includes maintenance works and modifications to the existing Hopper 5 hoppers, chutes and screens, SIMPEC said.

Worth A$2.1 million ($1.6 million), the vertical contract has commenced immediately, with works expected to be completed in April.

SIMPEC Managing Director, Mark Dimasi, said: “It has been a long-term goal of SIMPEC to work directly for Fortescue and to break into the field of sustaining capital works. By building our sustaining capital portfolio, SIMPEC aims to achieve a more stable cash flow as well as provide continuity for our workforce.

“This is a very proud moment for the team, and we look forward to successful completion of this project and what we hope will be a long-term relationship with Fortescue.”

Los Andes Copper engineers a Vizcachitas alternative

It is a combination of improved technology, reduced fine grind requirements and maintenance benefits that led to Los Andes Copper replacing the SAG and ball mill crushing circuit proposed in its Vizcachitas copper-molybdenum project preliminary economic assessment (PEA), with a three-stage crushing circuit that uses high pressure grinding roll (HPGR) technology in the tertiary crushing stage, according to Executive Chairman, Fernando Porcile.

In the middle of a prefeasibility study on the Vizcachitas project, Los Andes recently issued an update on the study progress.

A delay of PFS publication to the March quarter of 2021 due to the onset of COVID-19 impacting some of the metallurgical test work and field work at the project might have been the key takeaway for investors, but those in the mining technology game will be focusing on the revised process flowsheet being put forward at the Chile project.

One of the big changes was seen at the front end on the comminution side.

In the close to year since issuing the June 2019 PEA, and with the arrival of Porcile and his team, the company’s understanding of its orebody characteristics and the technology available to it as a new greenfield project owner has grown.

Porcile said the ore at Vizcachitas is very suitable to this energy efficient HPGR technology, with metallurgical test work showing an HPGR circuit can reduce the sensitivity to changes in hardness, providing a product that is more consistent in size. This will help reduce major process fluctuations downstream – where there have also been some changes.

The P80 target grind size of 240 microns hasn’t changed much – moving up to a P80 of 240-300 microns – but the SAG and ball mill circuit has been replaced with a three stage crushing circuit using secondary crushers in open circuit and HPGR as a tertiary crusher in closed circuit.

On the preliminary comminution process flowsheet, this includes the use of a Metso Superior™ MKIII primary gyratory crusher, feeding three Nordberg® MP2500™ cone crushers, which move into 40,000 t crushed ore bins. This material is then conveyed to two Metso HRC™ 2600 HPGRs.

Los Andes says the configuration of secondary cone crushers in an open circuit avoids the use of a coarse ore stockpile and recirculation conveyor belts – reducing dust emission sources – while the closed reverse grinding circuit allows less production of fines, which is helpful for the follow-on thickening and filtration stages.

On top of this, the secondary crushing and grinding plant in this setup is close to the primary crusher, which also reduces coarse ore conveying costs.

Porcile said HPGR technology has moved on a long way in the last decade and now represents a more reliable proposition than using the SAG and ball mill circuit previously proposed.

“There is much less risk associated with using HPGRs in a new operation,” he told IM. “Large SAG mills not only take up lots of space within the plant, they can also come with teething problems during start up.”

He added: “HPGRs used to come with lots of wear problems, meaning you had to replace the rollers often. The maintenance on them is that much better now; the rollers do not wear out as quickly and, when they do, you can easily replace them.”

On top of the obvious benefits in energy consumption that come with using HPGR technology, there are positives that can be felt further down the process flowsheet.

“We are very confident that HPGR is the best alternative for our project due to the nature and quality of our ore,” Porcile said. “We produce very little fines, which has an impact on the way we deal with tailings.”

The combination of a lack of fines and low presence of clays (mainly kaolinite) has helped filtration performance in test work, indicating that a dry-stacked tailings solution may be viable at Vizcachitas, Porcile said.

This could provide an up to 50% reduction in water consumption compared with the PEA at Vizcachitas. It could also see some 82% of water recovered throughout the process, in addition to a significant reduction in infrastructure requirements.

“We go from having infrastructure in two valleys in the PEA to one in the PFS,” Porcile said on the latter point.

One may think creating a dry-stacking operation at a 110,000 t/d throughput mine would prove costly and difficult, but the lack of fines and low presence of clays already mentioned means the process is a lot simpler to other dry-stacking projects currently on the table across the globe, according to Los Andes.

Test work to date has indicated that coarse material from the plant (plus-400 microns) could produce a cake with 14%-18% moisture through the use of belt conveyors. This material currently makes up 87% of the envisaged tonnage.

Only 13% of tonnage classed as fines (less than 400 microns) would have to go through pressure filters to produce a 16-19% moisture cake, according to the company.

Porcile says these belt filters work just as well as pressure filters on the coarse material from Vizcachitas but are that much more cost effective.

“Belt filters come with high filtration rates, are low cost (in terms of capex) and are reliable,” Porcile said. “In the study, we envisage saving pressure filters only for the very top level of material.”

While it is too early to talk about the impact these changes will have on the capital expenditure and net present value numbers to be included in the PFS, expect the $1.87 billion and $1.8 billion (after tax and with an 8% discount), respectively, to change.

Metso to help Pavlik Gold double processing capacity

Metso says Pavlik Gold JSC has chosen it as the supplier for the key crushing and grinding equipment for its ore processing plant in Magadan, Russia.

The Pavlik gold plant, which commenced its operations in 2015, currently produces around 225,000 oz/y of gold. With the new equipment, the plant expects to double its ore processing capacity and increase gold production, according to Metso.

Metso’s delivery consists of the primary crushing station with a Nordberg® C160™ jaw crusher, one SAG mill and two ball mills with a total installed power of more than 20 MW. The circa-€25 million ($27 million) order has been booked in Metso’s March quarter orders received, with delivery expected to take place in the first half of 2021.

Alexey Muzychkin, SVP, Russia and CIS, Metso, said: “We greatly value our long-term cooperation with Pavlik Gold, where Metso’s equipment has been in use already for several years. We are sure that the experience and technical competence of both companies in this type of projects will help us rapidly achieve the goals.”

Earlier this month, FLSmidth announced that it would supply a new 7 Mt/y gold processing plant to the mine. 

Metso equipment to rough up diamonds at De Beers Venetia mine

Metso is to install high-performance crushing and material handling equipment underground at the De Beers Group’s Venetia diamond mine, in South Africa, as part of an order booked in the September quarter.

In the throes of a transition from open-pit mining to underground operations, Venetia is reported to produce around 4 Mct/y, making it one of South Africa’s biggest diamond mines.

In 2013, an underground extension project commenced with plans to start producing carats in 2022, climbing to full production in 2025 and extending the mine life to 2046.

Metso said Venetia approached Metso to deliver two primary jaw crushers and a number of feeders. All the equipment will be installed underground, which is a very challenging installation, especially given the shaft constraints (dimensions) and weight limitations for transportation underground, the company added.

Venetia decided on Metso’s Nordberg® C Series™ jaw crusher range as the pinned and bolted design of the crusher allowed for the extensive disassembly, Metso said. “This enhances ease of transportation and installation, especially where there are critical space constraints such as an underground installation – as is the case with this project.”

The Metso apron feeders, meanwhile, are used for extracting or feeding ores that are wet, sticky, dry or even frozen.

Minprovise keeps crushing on track at Hope Downs 1 iron ore mine

Minprovise says it has completed a jaw crusher replacement project at Rio Tinto and Hancock Prospecting’s jointly owned Hope Downs 1 iron ore mine site in the Pilbara of Western Australia.

The crusher in question, a Metso Nordberg C160, is Hope Downs’ primary crusher. Minprovise was selected for this project due to the positive references it has previously received carrying out similar work in the field, the mineral processing equipment and site services provider said.

The crusher replacement was the second such project completed in the last year by Minprovise, the first being undertaken at the West Angelas mine site (part of the Rio-majority owned Robe River joint venture), located in Newman, in late 2018.

Hope Downs 1 is part of the Hope Downs joint venture. The Hope Downs 1 and 4 deposits produced 46.9 Mt of iron ore in 2017, according to Rio.

“The large-scale site maintenance project required careful quality control and site safety management in the lead up to, and during, the crusher replacement,” Minprovise said. The team were required to safely and efficiently remove the old jaw crusher model and replace it with the newer C160 model in its already established and confined structure, according to the company.

“Minprovise’s end-to-end business model and internal manufacture and fabrication capabilities meant that the team were also able to fabricate the appropriate and tailormade transport frames, jigs and chute covers for the optimised safety of the project,” it said.

To complete the lift, the company used a 500 t crane to safely manoeuvre the 78 t crusher mainframe into place.

As the sole provider of the install process, Minprovise was required to coordinate between the client, the transport agency, the crane provider and the crusher manufacturer to ensure a smooth and time efficient process, it said. “Minprovise’s phase of the replacement project was completed in the originally quoted and designated amount of time, with no hiccups or costly time-delays.”

The fabrication and install of the crushers casting plates to take the full impact of the crushers vibrations was also undertaken by Minprovise employees.

Throughout the entire process – which included concrete cutting and jackhammering of the support base, removal and replacement of the casting plates, re-grouting of the new base and plates and heavy lift and install of the crusher – zero safety incidents or minor injuries were reported, according to the company.

Metso to keep its crushers working for longer with O-Series liners

Metso says it is expanding its crusher wear part offering by launching a new range of OEM crusher liners.

Available for selected markets from September, the new Metso O-Series offers the right balance between performance, affordability and reliability, the company said.

Olli Heinonen, Head of O-Series development at Metso, said: “The Metso O-Series offers a value-priced alternative that is ideal when you need to focus on optimising daily operations, while our premium crusher wears range ensures additional durability, performance and maximum return on investment.”

The Metso O-Series range is now available for Metso Nordberg® HP Series™ and GP Series™ cone crushers as well as C Series™ jaw crushers, Metso said. In the first phase, the new range will be sold through Metso sales offices, and the accredited Metso distributors in China, Mexico, Central America, and Asia Pacific.

Heinonen concluded: “The Metso O-Series was created in close cooperation and dialogue with our customers to especially meet the business requirements in rapidly developing markets. We are excited about this new range and the new opportunities to help our customers get better control of their operations without compromising on quality. Going forward, we’re looking into bringing further crusher models to the range as well as introducing it to additional markets.”

Metso celebrates 10,000th Nordberg HP cone crusher sale

Metso says it has reached the significant milestone of 10,000 Nordberg® HP cone crushers sold globally.

The most popular modern cone crusher in the world, the company says, the HP Series™ celebrates its 30th anniversary this year.

The 10,000th HP cone crusher unit was handed over to the French aggregates and asphalt producer and urban infrastructure development company, Eurovia, in a ceremony held today at Metso’s Mâcon facility in France.

Arto Halonen, Vice President, Aggregates Crushers at Metso, said: “The HP is undoubtedly one of Metso’s most widely used innovations. It’s a technology that has been evolving throughout the years to meet customers’ changing needs, making their operations more successful through proven performance and reliable output. That’s most likely why HP has become an industry standard for a variety of aggregates and mining applications.”

The origin of the HP Series cone crusher can be tracked back to Milwaukee, USA, in the early to mid-1980s. “The technological breakthroughs by the Nordberg research program re-defined crushing performance and provided the basis for a new type of cone crusher introduced in 1989: the Nordberg High-Performance cone crusher series, today simply known as the HP,” Metso said.

Today, HP cone crushers are engineered and manufactured in Metso’s competence centre in Mâcon, France, with manufacturing also in Brazil, China and India.

A versatile crusher, it is used in a wide range of fixed and mobile applications, varying from limestone to taconite and ballast production to manufactured sand, Metso said.

Halonen continued: “Know-how from developing the HP and from thousands and thousands of customer applications around the world has played an integral part in Metso research and development initiatives in crushing.

“This is an important milestone for Metso and we want to thank our customers for their continued confidence in us during the first 30 years of the HP’s journey and look forward to explore new development possibilities in the years to come.”