Tag Archives: Carmichael

Bravus to employ SMW Group Ultrahaul truck trays on Carmichael Cat 796 AC fleet

Bravus Mining & Resources has awarded contracts worth more than A$3 million ($2.2 million) to Rockhampton-based SMW Group for a series of new Ultrahaul mine truck trays and a bore field maintenance program.

Bravus Mining & Resources CEO, David Boshoff, said Bravus was keen to capitalise on SMW Group’s 20 years of experience servicing central Queensland’s coal fields.

“There’s an extensive mining services knowledge base in our region, and it has always been our intention to use this and work with businesses based in central Queensland wherever possible,” Boshoff said.

“The Ultrahaul tray is a class-leading product for mine haul trucks that SMW Group has developed specifically for the central Queensland coal industry. The trays are tailored for our fleet of Cat 796 AC haul trucks and will help to maximise production and improve operational efficiency.

“We have been impressed by SMW Group’s willingness to work with us to get the product right for our operations and look forward to seeing the results of this relationship over time.”

SMW Group Chief Operating Officer, Frank Humphreys, said that the contract was a great result for the company and central Queensland manufacturing.

“Securing a contract to supply Ultrahaul trays to the Carmichael Project is a great outcome for SMW Group and is a vote of confidence for central Queensland’s mining services industry,” Humphreys said.

“We are excited to be involved with a high-profile operation like the Carmichael Project.”

Boshoff said the contract would have direct benefits for Mackay and Rockhampton, bolstering the local economies against the impacts of COVID restrictions.

“Having this level of manufacturing capacity in our region is a huge boost, because we can continue to grow our fleet and ramp up operations with minimal impact from COVID induced restrictions and border closures,” he said.

“We are proud to have made good on our promises to Queensland, and especially regional Queensland. We have created more than 2,600 jobs and signed more than $2.2 billion in contracts.

“More than 88% of our contracts are being delivered in Queensland. This work has been spread across all corners of the state to give as many regions as possible the opportunity to benefit from our project, while also enabling us to tap into the highly-skilled construction and resources industry workforce that Queensland possesses.

“We are ramping up our mining fleet and construction on the Coal Handling and Processing Plant is well underway. We are excited to be so close to delivering on our promise to ship first coal this year.”

Hillery Group to deliver A$15 million of rail infrastructure for Carmichael

Bowen Rail Company has contracted the Hillery Group to construct a new rail yard at the Carmichael coal mine and rail project in Queensland, Australia.

The A$15 million ($11 million) rail yard will be an important part of the business’ long term operating plan but is not required for the company to commence rail operations later this year, Bowen Rail said.

Bowen Rail Company CEO, Trista Brohier, said partnering with Hillery was another example of how Bowen Rail was delivering on its promises of jobs and work packages for the Whitsunday region.

“We’re pleased that we can now share with the Bowen community how our commitments on jobs and contracts for the Whitsundays are coming to life,” Brohier said. “Partnering with Hillery is a perfect example of this and we couldn’t have picked a better local company to do the job considering their strong technical expertise and knowledge of the region.”

Hillery Group is a family-owned business in Bowen, Queensland, stablished over 30 years ago with, currently, more than 100 employees. Hillery Group specialises in civil construction and plant hire and is an operator of four local quarries, supplying these materials across regional Queensland.

CEO of Hillery Group, Luke Hillery, said the project was a big win for his business and the community.

“We’re really proud to have been given the opportunity to deliver this critical piece of infrastructure for Bowen Rail,” Hillery said. “We see the value that this business will bring to our region for the long term, and it’s great to be one of the first cabs off the rank to win a big contract of this nature. It’s not often we see contracts to build rail yards in Bowen, so we were excited at the opportunity to partner with the Bowen Rail team.”

Brohier said clearing and earthworks are now well progressed in the rail yard’s delivery, with other exciting announcements for Bowen Rail expected shortly.

“We launched the Bowen Rail company in August last year, and we have been enthusiastically working behind the scenes since then to establish our business for operations,” she said.

“We’ve been busy setting up our systems, team and infrastructure, and we’re looking forward to sharing our ongoing progress with our fellow community members as we work towards running trains with our first customer’s coal product from the Carmichael mine later this year. Watch this space!”

DRA Global to deliver Carmichael coal handling and preparation plant

DRA Global has won its second major contract on the Bravus Mining & Resources-owned Carmichael coal project, in Queensland, Australia, with the engineering firm set to deliver the project’s A$140 million ($108 million) coal processing plant.

Bravus CEO, David Boshoff, said DRA was known for its exceptional service to the Australian resources sector, and previous work on the Carmichael project building the coal handling plant (CHP) had demonstrated its experience and capability.

The coal handling plant (CHP) and the coal preparation plant (CPP) will work together to prepare and process the coal to meet market specifications at Carmichael.

The CPP is designed to process the coal, using recycled water and density separation processes so that the product that goes into market is more energy efficient and environmentally friendly, DRA says.

DRA will carry out the engineering, design and construction of the CHP and the CPP at Carmichael. Included within this is the supply and construction of coal processing infrastructure; supply and construction of coal sizing and conveying equipment; construction of coal stockpiling infrastructure; and construction of the train load out infrastructure to enable loading of trains.

According to the original project description from October 2013 authored by engineering services company GHD, the project’s coal handling and preparation plant has been designed to receive, size and process a maximum throughput of 74.5 Mt/y run of mine coal, producing 60 Mt/y of product coal. However, this is the maximum approved production level. Initial mine production will be 10 Mt/y with a surface mine capacity of 40 Mt/y, rising to 60 Mt/y when the underground mine comes online.

DRA Global CEO, Andrew Naude, said: “DRA is delighted to have been awarded an additional major contract on the Carmichael project and to be able to continue creating employment opportunities and supporting the Central Queensland region.”

Boshoff said: “The CHP resizes the coal and the CPP processes the coal to meet final product quality requirements and in doing so it is more energy efficient and environmentally friendly. It is these facilities that will see Carmichael coal become some of the better-quality coal from around the world.”

He added: “Every week we are reaching exciting new major milestones on the Carmichael mine and rail projects bringing us a step closer to the reality of completion. We are on track and looking forward to producing first coal in 2021.”

Martinus wins another Carmichael rail contract with Adani Australia

Adani has awarded a plus-A$220 million ($139.3 million) civil construction contract to Martinus to build a critical section of the railway for the Carmichael coal project, in Queensland, Australia.

The contract for the Carmichael Rail Network will see the Australia rail company deliver 86 km of rail formation works, a road over rail bridge, nine waterway bridges, more than 200 culverts and 35 rail crossings.

Late last year, Martinus was awarded the track works component, worth more than A$100 million, to deliver around 210 km of narrow-gauge rail from the Carmichael mine to the existing rail infrastructure.

The transport network underpins the first stage of the 10 Mt/y coal project at Carmichael, which was given the thumbs up to start construction in 2019. It will see a narrow gauge rail network built that connects to existing rail infrastructure and goes from the mine to the Port of Abbot Point. The initial design capacity of this line is for 40 Mt/y, with the ability to further expand, according to Adani.

Martinus CEO and Managing Director, Treaven Martinus, said: “Our focus has been to be the best large-scale railway construction contractor in Australia and being a part of this project enables us to fulfil that vision.”

He added: “Our 600-strong project delivery workforce will be based in Townsville and Rockhampton and partnering with local and other regional Queensland businesses and people, while also upholding the highest standards of project delivery across environmental and safety conditions.”

Adani Mining CEO, Lucas Dow, said the contract with Martinus would deliver some 600 new jobs, which was more important than ever as the local community braces to withstand the economic shifts being brought about by the COVID-19 virus.

“We’re following all advice from Queensland Health and the Federal Government and doing all we can to keep our people and the community safe,” Dow said.

“We also understand how important it is to continue our operations where safe and practicable to provide certainty of employment for our staff and contractors. I want to make it clear that the health and safety of our staff is our first priority, however, where we are able to continue to operate safely and in line with advice, we will do so.”

Dow said the company had implemented measures including social distancing, health screening and increased hygiene in the hope more of its contractors, suppliers and the businesses that depend on the company can also “weather the storm, keeping their doors open, services running, and importantly provide certainty of employment”.

In addition to the Martinus announcement, Adani said assembly of its first mining trucks was now complete, with two heavy vehicles having left Mackay, in Queensland, to make the plus-300 km trip to the Carmichael mine site this week.

These are the first of more than 24 trucks being assembled in Mackay, which is thought to include electric drive Caterpillar 796 AC (327 t) models.

Wagners to deliver quarry contract at Adani’s Carmichael coal project

Toowoomba, Queensland-based Wagners has been announced as the lead contractor to deliver a plus-A$35 million ($23.7 million) quarry operations package for Adani’s Carmichael coal project, in the Australian state.

The contract will see Wagners build and operate the quarry, which will be located about 160 km outside Clermont, and deliver quarry materials for supporting infrastructure on the Carmichael mine and rail projects, such as roads, camps, pads, dams and mine civil works.

Wagners are known for the expertise in developing and operating hard-rock quarries, after commencing quarry operations 25 years ago to support their own pre-mixed concrete business, Adani said.

The announcement comes soon after Martinus was awarded a plus A$100 million rail laying contract and Decmil receiving a plus-A$40 million contract to build rail camps, both being delivered out of Rockhampton.

The development of the first stage 10 Mt/y coal mine at Carmichael, which was given the thumbs up to start construction earlier this year, will see a circa-200 km narrow gauge rail network built that connects to existing rail infrastructure and goes from the mine to the Port of Abbot Point. The initial design capacity of this line is for 40 Mt/y, with the ability to further expand, according to Adani.

Carmichael Project Director, David Boshoff, said: “We have more than A$500 million in contracts now awarded for the Carmichael project and we are reaching out to all corners of the state to help us deliver them.”

He added: “The operations of the rail camps will be based in Collinsville, earthworks and civil works are coming from Townsville and Rockhampton, fuel supply is from Townsville, telecommunications is from Mackay, rail track laying and rail camp construction is from Rockhampton and many other regional businesses and locations across regional Queensland are also getting involved.”

Decmil Group wins work on Adani’s Carmichael coal project

Decmil Group says it has been awarded two packages of work on the Adani-owned Carmichael coal project in Queensland, Australia.

The two contracts, worth some A$41.4 million ($28.5 million) in total, will see its Queensland business unit design and construct the rail accommodation on the rail network, with the second package being an early contractor services (ECS) contract to scope the bulk earthworks required along the primary freight rail alignment.

Should the ECS be successfully completed it is anticipated Decmil will enter into contractfor the construction works, it said.

The development of the first stage 10 Mt/y coal mine at Carmichael, which was given the thumbs up to start construction earlier this year, will see a circa-200 km narrow gauge rail network built that connects to existing rail infrastructure and goes from the mine to the Port of Abbot Point. The initial design capacity of this line is for 40 Mt/y, with the ability to further expand, according to Adani.

Work is expected to commence immediately on both packages, according to Decmil.

 

Adani signs up Martinus for Carmichael rail contract

Adani has announced a more than A$100 million ($68 million) rail contract for the Carmichael thermal coal project has been awarded to Martinus Rail, with the contractor set to base itself out of Adani’s newly opened Rockhampton Business Centre (pictured).

The contract award and delivery out of the centre will ensure “Rockhampton businesses and people will be in prime position to participate in the contract delivery”, the company said.

The development of the first stage 10 Mt/y coal mine at Carmichael, which was given the thumbs up to start construction earlier this year, will lead to the building of a circa-200 km narrow gauge rail network that connects to existing rail infrastructure and goes from the mine to the Port of Abbot Point. The initial design capacity of this line is for 40 Mt/y, with the ability to further expand, according to Adani.

Adani Mining CEO, Lucas Dow, said more than A$450 million worth of contracts had already been awarded on the Carmichael project, the majority to regional Queensland areas.

“Since receiving our approvals we have not wasted a moment. Construction on the Carmichael mine and rail project is well and truly underway on site, and our big contracts are now also lined up as we ramp up activity.”

He added: “We now have our mining services contractor and one of our earthworks contractors for the rail project in place based in Rockhampton, Martinus Rail will be our rail laying construction contractor also in based in Rockhampton, initial rail camp provision will be based in Collinsville, earthworks and civil works is coming from Townsville, fuel supply is from Townsville, telecommunications is from Mackay, and many other regional businesses across regional Queensland also have a piece of the pie,” he said.

Managing Director for Martinus Rail, Treaven Martinus, said Martinus is a large-scale railway construction contractor with a focus on delivering regional railways for mining and government clients across Australia and New Zealand. “Our business delivers large-scale regional rail projects across Australia and we do it successfully by tapping into the local workforce, which is a commercially viable approach for us while also providing training, skills and benefits for local communities,” he said.

Dow, meanwhile, said the new Adani Rockhampton Business Centre would provide a local base for major procurement and recruitment programs for the Carmichael project during the construction phase and during operations.

“Our new Rockhampton Business Centre will help us ensure Rockhampton and Townsville, where we have an existing office, act as the primary employment hubs for the Carmichael project,” he said.

The business centre will be a base for recruitment and procurement activity and will be used for training sessions, meet the buyer sessions, recruitment interviews, staff induction programs, act as a base for some of our contractors and more.

Community engagement and automation on the AIMEX agenda

Day one of AIMEX 2019 in Sydney, Australia, was as varied as mining events come. Against an exhibition backdrop that organisers say included more than 500 suppliers, leaders in the industry took to the conference stage to debate some of the industry hottest topics.

The morning sessions started off with discussions on the relationship between the mining sector and local stakeholders, an area of dialogue that becomes more dynamic with every mining, extraction or water use permit issued in Australia.

Stephen Galilee, Chief Executive Officer of the New South Wales (NSW) Minerals Council, was the first speaker to confront the topic and was, rightly, keen to talk up some of the success stories that the state had seen in the recent past.

He said the NSW Minerals Council addressed local community’s priorities through its Upper Hunter Mining Dialogue project, which he believes is one of the world’s best engagement community practices.

A panel, chaired by Austmine CEO Christine Gibbs-Stewart, followed shortly after Galilee and expanded on this line of discussion, with Mark Jacobs, Executive General Manager – Environment & Community, Yancoal Australia, and Ngaire Baker, External Relations Manager of Mach Energy, providing specific examples of how their companies have developed a working relationship with not just the communities surrounding their mines, but also interested parties within the states in which they operate.

Jacobs said the digital age and transparency of reporting has brought miners a lot closer to the communities that surround them than, say, 20 years ago, but he admitted Yancoal Australia and his peers in Australia needed to do more to rebuild the trust that was lost in previous decades. He added that local media played a strong role in this quest.

Baker, meanwhile, recalled several anecdotes about how Mach Energy was building strong community relationships by effectively communicating how the mining company was going about its business of starting up the Mount Pleasant thermal coal mine in the Hunter Valley, explaining what effects this might have on local businesses, as well as inviting them to the operation to gain a better understanding of the mine.

Jacobs and Baker made compelling points, but Anna Littleboy, Programme Leader – Mine Lifecycles, Sustainable Minerals Institute, University of Queensland, made it clear the success of a mine or project was contingent on not only winning over the local community.

“I’m not sure the image of the industry is made or broken at the community level,” she said.

The Adani Carmichael coal project, in the Bowen Basin of Queensland, is a case in point, where local stakeholders have made it clear they would like the thermal coal development to go ahead, but issues on a national and international level have made it increasingly difficult to proceed. This is despite the company recently receiving a significant permit to proceed with construction.

Before the panel discussion ended, the speakers talked about what impact technology may have on local communities, with Gibbs-Stewart questioning what mine site communities could look like in an autonomous future where people no longer operated the machines.

The panellists said these communities could potentially become technology hubs servicing such operations, but Jacobs remarked that local and state governments needed to ensure the infrastructure was in place to allow such a transition to take place.

The next few conference sessions picked up the automation ball and ran with it.

Craig Hurkett, Managing Director, Enterprise Improvement Solutions, explored the challenges and opportunities that came with delivering autonomous vehicle maintenance. His talk touched on just how expensive the current fleet of autonomous machines were to keep running at full tilt.

Robin Burgess-Limerick, Professorial Research Fellow at the University of Queensland, took a different angle in his presentation: ‘Human-systems integration for the safe introduction of automation to mines and quarries’.

He made it clear that automation would change the established safety systems in place at both open-pit and underground mines. He also touched on some accidents that had occurred both above and below ground when autonomous equipment came into contact with either personnel or manned vehicles, but then countered this with details of a past paper he had co-authored on operations at the Northparkes underground mine in New South Wales where the use of autonomous vehicles had seen significant safety improvements as well as a 23% productivity boost compared with previous manual mode.

Factoring this in, he said mining companies and equipment manufacturers needed to ensure that autonomous equipment was designed for the specific operation it was going into and that manual overrides were not used as a workaround to improve productivity – which in the underground US coal mine example he gave resulted in a fatality.

It was then the turn of Dr Joe Cronin, Co-Founder, Australian Droid + Robot, on stage. Cronin, who has helped design autonomous underground systems at both Northparkes and the Syama underground mine (Mali), was positive automation was coming to mining at a pace that would catch many industry participants off guard; meaning they needed to invest to facilitate this change now.

His talk, ‘Using Telepresence technologies for the safe deployment of wireless mesh networks and underground inspection robots in mines’, focused on the improved communications infrastructure in mines and ability for robots and drones to travel into increasingly difficult areas of a mine. This, he said, would see risky tasks currently carried out by people, in the future, taken on by these machines.

Personnel would no longer need to travel underground to carry out sampling in active stopes, with these robust and agile robots able to give them the information they needed through payloads that could carry out 3D scans, take high resolution photos, sense dangerous gases and interpret potential rock falls.

This would not only increase safety underground, it would also allow autonomous operations to run 24/7, according to Cronin, with these robots working unimpeded alongside autonomous equipment.

Reflecting on the proliferation of drones in the open-pit mining space, Cronin estimated that in five years’ time, every underground mine would be using robots or drones to inspect hazardous areas of their mines.

Adani Mining’s Carmichael coal mine plan gets the thumbs up

Adani Mining’s plan to build a 10 Mt/y open-pit thermal coal mine and associated infrastructure in the Galilee Basin of Queensland, Australia, looks like moving forward after the company sealed the final approvals it requires to start construction.

Lucas Dow, CEO Adani Mining, confirmed that the company had received advice from the Queensland Government’s Department of Environment and Science (DES) that the Groundwater Dependent Ecosystems Management Plan (GDEMP) had been finalised and approved.

“This is confirmation the plan complies with all regulatory conditions set by the Australian and State Governments, bringing to a close a two-year process of rigorous scientific enquiry, review and approvals,” he said. “This includes relevant reviews by Australia’s pre-eminent scientific organisations CSIRO and Geoscience Australia.”

The development of the first stage 10 Mt/y coal mine will also lead to the building of a circa-200 km narrow gauge rail network that connects to existing rail infrastructure and goes from the mine to the Port of Abbot Point. The initial design capacity of this line is for 40 Mt/y, with the ability to further expand, according to Adani.

The project has faced significant opposition from non-governmental organisations and other associations worried about the impact the mine may have on the local area.

Dow continued: “The finalisation of the GDEMP and Black-throated Finch Management Plan paves the way for construction to commence on the Carmichael project and the delivery of much-needed jobs for regional Queenslanders.

“Moving forward, our priority is ensuring the safety of everyone who works on the project and that all construction activity meets the strict environmental requirements we have agreed to meet in our management plans and approvals.”

Wood Mackenzie Principal Analyst, Viktor Tanevski, said, in another statement, the firm remained “cautious” on the timeframe for delivery of first coal onto a vessel from the operation given the “sizeable task of building out both a new large-scale mine and greenfield rail connection”.

He said: “We anticipate at least a 12-month delay to Adani’s target of first coal exports, approximately two years from the commencement of construction, predominantly associated with delays in the construction of rail.”

The DES, in a separate statement, said it requires additional commitments from Adani to undertake further scientific work over the next two years. This is needed to identify any potential contribution from other aquifers and strengthen the GDEMP.

“Adani is also required to review hydrological, hydrochemistry analyses and seismic information as part of its second geological and groundwater remodelling after box cut mining starts, and review seismic information pertaining underground mining impacts (which is scheduled to start in year 10 of the project),” DES said. “Further seismic studies may also need to be undertaken.”

According to DES, underground mining at Carmichael will not commence until the actions are completed and only if “predicted impacts are consistent with approved impacts”.

“Likewise, if the hydrogeological conceptualisation differs from that of the approved project, approval must be sought prior to relevant impact causing activities,” it said.

Adani’s Dow said, over the coming days, preparatory activities such as finalising contracts, mobilising equipment, recruitment and completing inductions will continue. These actions will enable the company to start construction activities, including fencing, bridge and road upgrades, water management and civil earthworks on the mine site, with the level of construction activity then steadily increasing over the coming weeks.

The original plan at Carmichael, as stated in the Environmental Impact Statement, was for an open-pit and underground coal mine with a yield of 60 Mt/y. The planned A$16.5 billion ($11.2 billion) investment would see the development of six open pits and five underground mines, five mine infrastructure areas, a coal handling and processing plant, heavy industrial area, water-supply infrastructure, rail line and off-site infrastructure, including workers’ accommodation village and airport, according to the EIS.

Adani Mining finds funds for Carmichael thermal coal project in Queensland

Adani Mining has managed to get together the financing needed to develop its massive Carmichael coal mine and rail project in Queensland, Australia, after parent company, the Adani Group, said 100% of the funds would come through its own resources.

The announcement follows recent changes to simplify construction and reduce the initial capital requirements for Carmichael, which is expected to produce some 27.5 Mt/y of high-quality thermal coal once fully ramped up.

Adani Mining CEO Lucas Dow said construction and operation of the mine will now begin.

“Our work in recent months has culminated in Adani Group’s approval of the revised project plan that de-risks the initial stage of the Carmichael mine and rail project by adopting a narrow-gauge rail solution combined with a reduced ramp up volume for the mine,” Dow said.

“This means we’ve minimised our execution risk and initial capital outlay. The sharpening of the mine plan has kept operating costs to a minimum and ensures the project remains within the first quartile of the global cost curve. All coal produced in the initial ramp up phase will be consumed by the Adani Group’s captive requirements.

“We will now begin developing a smaller open-cut mine comparable to many other Queensland coal mines and will ramp up production over time to 27.5 Mt/y,” he said.

The construction for the shorter narrow-gauge rail line will also begin to match the production schedule, he added.

The company has already invested $3.3 billion in Adani’s Australian businesses, according to Dow. “[This] is a clear demonstration of our capacity to deliver a financing solution for the revised scope of the mine and rail project.

Carmichael is expected to deliver more than 1,500 direct jobs on the mine and rail projects during the initial ramp-up and construction phase, and will support thousands more indirect jobs, all of which will benefit regional Queensland communities, Adani said.

Preparatory works at the mine site are imminent and Adani Mining is working with regulators to finalise the remaining required management plans, ahead of coal production, some of which have been subject to two years of state and federal government review.

“This process is expected to be complete and provided by the governments in the next few weeks,” Adani said.

Today’s announcement follows eight years of planning, securing approvals and successfully contesting legal challenges from anti-mining activists, according to Dow.

“We have worked tirelessly to clear the required hurdles,” he said. “Given we meet the same environmental standards and operate under the same regulations as other miners, we expect that Adani Mining will be treated no differently than any other Queensland mining company.”

Located more than 300 km west of the Queensland coast, the Carmichael thermal coal mine and rail project will transport coal from the Galilee Basin to countries in Asia, including India, Vietnam and China.

In addition to the number of jobs and tax revenues Carmichael will create, the mine will also open the north Galilee Basin for further development, according to Tania Constable, Chief Executive Officer of the Minerals Council of Australia.

“[This is] an exciting new phase in Australia’s rich history of mining exploration and development, which has made our nation a global mining powerhouse,” she said.