Tag Archives: mining conveyors

Fenner Dunlop ACE wins overland conveyor contract from Anglo American

Fenner Dunlop ACE has been contracted to deliver an overland conveyor system for Anglo American’s Aquila coal project in Queensland, Australia.

Aquila is an underground hard coking coal mine near Middlemount, which will extend the life of Anglo American’s existing Capcoal underground operations by six years. It comes with an expected capital cost of $226 million (Anglo American share), with first longwall production of premium quality hard coking coal expected in early 2022, according to Anglo.

Tyler Mitchelson, CEO of Anglo American’s Metallurgical Coal business, has previously said Aquila will become one of the most “technologically advanced underground mines in the world”.

Under the new contract award, Fenner Dunlop ACE will undertake the complete design, supply and installation of the ACV002 Overland Conveyor. Works will include the overland structure, belting, electrics and an elevated stacker to load coal onto the site stockpile. Several conveyor components, including mechanical supply, electrical supply and belting, will be manufactured in Australia.

Brendon Harms, Regional Manager ACE QLD, said: “After delivery of the initial underground development works, we are very excited to be working on this project. We believe we have created a culture of delivering on our promises. Completing the design, supply and installation give us a great opportunity to ensure effective conveyor operation for our client.”

Fenner Dunlop ACE will also be responsible for the complete install and commissioning of the overland conveyor, providing even further responsibility and ownership for the project. The overland conveyor project is expected to be commissioned in the second half of 2021.

Fenner Dunlop presses ahead with Western Australia expansion plans

Fenner Dunlop is to once again expand its Kwinana manufacturing facility in Western Australia, with a third steel cord press line set to boost capacity by 50%.

Since opening the A$70 million ($50 million) manufacturing facility in Kwinana, in 2009, the company has looked to progressively expand its capabilities in line with market demand.

The original facility, built specifically to produce steel cord belting, represented, at the time, the largest investment in conveyor belting manufacturer ever made in Australia by any company, according to the company.

In 2013, an additional A$20 million was invested to install a second press line to double the plant’s production capacity and increase the Kwinana workforce by 30%.

“Australian manufacturing has survived many challenges over the past decade,” the company said. “The COVID-19 crisis in 2020 has demonstrated the value of Australian manufacturing to the economy and to the mining sector in particular.

“While other companies are contracting and moving their manufacturing operations offshore, Fenner Dunlop continues to support the local economy and is proud to be the largest conveyor belt supplier in Australia and the only company to manufacture the complete range of conveyor belts for all mining applications locally.”

Today the facility houses two of the world’s largest steel cord press lines and has the capability to produce steel cord and rubber ply belting up to 3,200 mm wide and up to 50 mm thick.

Steve Abbott, Chief Operating Officer, said: “Kwinana is close to its main customers, allowing us to provide a quality product with reduced lead times while keeping the investment in Western Australia.

“Our customers have the convenience of dealing with a global business, supported by a state-of-the-art conveyor belt manufacturing facility in their backyard and the assurance of technical support that understands the local operational environment.”

These customers include Rio Tinto, BHP and many more.

Fenner Dunlop says it is once again partnering with Siempelkamp to commission the third line, which is the finest multi-piston press and associated equipment in the world, continuing the longstanding partnership in the production of high-quality conveyor belts.

The third line will increase the plant‘s capacity by a further 50%, and additional investment will support the efficient manufacture of fabric conveyor belts for Western Australian customers, the company added.

Abbott said: “The plant expansion is part of our longer-term strategy, following the plant opening in 2009 and the initial expansion in 2013. While the expansion is a reflection of our success, it allows us to maintain our responsiveness in quoting, production and delivery to meet the constantly changing requirements of our customers.”

The A$23.5 million investment is part of Fenner Dunlop’s commitment to grow its conveyor belt production to meet the increasing demand in Western Australia, it said.

The manufacturing plant also incorporates a testing and R&D laboratory to ensure all work is done to the highest quality and safety standards and all systems are under constant review and continual improvement.

Site work is scheduled to start in March 2021 with the commissioning in December 2021. The new press line will start full production in January 2022, according to the company.

Flexco lays ground for growth in Europe with bigger Rosenfeld facility

Flexco’s Europe division has recently moved into a larger complex in Rosenfeld, Germany, as it addresses existing space constraints and allows for future growth of the operation.

Joerg Schairer, Managing Director of Flexco Europe GmbH, said: “The reasons behind our decision to build it were complex. We have always pursued the goal of becoming the most important contact in the sector for operations who want to maximise the productivity of their conveyor systems. The new building will help us to achieve this goal, because it has the space that allows us to manufacture new, innovative products that solve our customers’ biggest conveyor challenges – and we’ll also be able to offer our customers the best possible support in our modern training centre.”

The facility is 10,741 sq.m, with 3,200 sq.m dedicated to administrative functions, while the other 7,500 sq.m houses production, storage, and shipping. The location more than doubles the size of all departments and provides opportunities for workforce expansion, the conveyor-focused specialist said.

“The new facility gives us space for more than 100 attractive jobs,” Schairer said. “We have increased our workforce by 15% in the past 12 months and, in the future, will be doubling the number of apprenticeships we offer.”

With construction of the new building, Flexco was looking for a more modern, open design that would optimise the exchange of information between its employees and customers, it said.

“Since Flexco has a long history of manufacturing innovative, high-quality products, the design team wanted to make sure the use of modern technologies were high on the list of requirements,” the company said. The resulting facility encompasses all these features, with more to come, it added.

“We’ll be developing the site into one of the most modern competence centres in Europe for belt conveyor productivity in a variety of industries and applications,” Schairer said. “We understand the challenges of customers – from food, to parcel handling, to laundry, to mining, and more – and support them in finding safer, more efficient solutions. Flexco University, online training courses, webinars, on-site trainings, and industrial networks are just a few of the offerings through which our customers can benefit from our experience and know-how.”

Martin Engineering conveys speciality contractor message

Using a specialty contractor for installation and ongoing maintenance of conveyor belts contributes to safer and more efficient production – with less unscheduled downtime – and, in the long run, saves money and reduces injuries, according to Martin Engineering.

“Performance problems with conveyor components and systems can frequently be traced to improper installation or insufficient maintenance,” the bulk material handling innovator says. “It is recommended that the component manufacturer or expert contractor install equipment on both new and retrofit applications.”

Serious performance problems stem from a lack of proper maintenance, which is exacerbated by several factors.

Training and retention

The time and resources required to train employees on equipment and certify them to conduct certain procedures such as confined space entry, electrical work, etc can be a significant ongoing expense, Martin Engineering says.

As workers become more experienced and gain certifications to properly maintain efficient systems, their value in the marketplace rises. This leads to retention becoming an issue.

“In contrast, specialty contractors must be experienced, knowledgeable and certified to conduct the appointed maintenance, and it’s up to the contracted company to retain and train that staff,” the company says.

Maintenance danger zones

Due to a greater emphasis on safety and the expensive consequences of unscheduled downtime, bulk handlers are being more meticulous about conveyor operation and maintenance, according to Martin Engineering.

This increased scrutiny includes regular cleaning of spillage, improved dust control, and additional monitoring and maintenance, which expose employees to a moving system more often. These changes introduce a variety of hazards.

Conveyor danger zones where work injuries are likely to occur include:

  • Loading zone;
  • Discharge zone;
  • Mechanical/electrical equipment;
  • Rotating pinch/shear points;
  • Underneath the conveyor; and
  • Unguarded reach-in points.
Danger zones exist along the entire length of the belt, many at maintenance points

“Most common conveyor-related issues are found across a wide range of industries, and personnel who work around the equipment on a daily basis often become complacent about the conditions, viewing issues as an unavoidable outcome of production rather than abnormalities in need of resolution,” the company says.

“An experienced maintenance contractor recognises these problems and may present solutions that internal resources have overlooked. The improvements are designed to reduce employee exposure, improve workplace safety and maximise productivity.”

Service contract types

Maintenance programs differ by provider and may be customisable to suit individual customers, but they generally fall into three categories: inspection/report, cleaning/servicing and full service.

A scheduled inspection and report contract results in a specialty contractor coming to site to thoroughly examine a system – from belt health to equipment function to the surrounding environment – and identify potential issues. A report is produced that presents findings and offers solutions.

The cleaning and servicing contracts are perhaps the most common, Martin Engineering says.

From spillage and silo cleaning to monitoring and changing belt cleaner blades, services can be very specific and fill gaps where maintenance crews might be overstretched. “The first advantage to this is that a conveyor can be surveyed without requiring the attention of plant personnel, freeing them to go about their usual tasks,” the company says. “A second advantage is that the outside surveyor is an expert in proper conveyor practices and current governmental regulations.”

At the highest level, a full service and maintenance contract sends trained technicians who take accountability for monitoring, maintaining and reporting on every level of system function. They replace wear components when needed and propose required upgrades to maximise efficiency, safety and uptime.

“This provides operators with cost certainty, making it easier to project and manage the cost of operation,” the company says.

Return on investment (ROI)

Increasing speeds and volumes on older conveyor systems designed for lower production levels contribute to workplace injuries and increased downtime. Capital investments in newer semi- or fully-automated systems designed for higher throughput require less labour, but the maintenance staff needs to be highly trained by specialised technicians.

Maintenance service contracts deliver the best ROI, according to Martin Engineering, through a series of factors:

  • Compliance – the contractor points out compliance issues and offers solutions prior to expensive fines and violations;
  • Injuries/liability – contractors rely on a strict set of safety procedures to conduct maintenance, reducing liability;
  • Efficiency – maintenance service contracts focus on improving and sustaining uptime with the least capital investment possible;
  • Consistency – contractors have a clear directive and are not affected by internal factors (labour disputes, morale, etc); and
  • Cost of operation – with a defined scope of work on a set budget, along with clear reporting and recommendations on pending needs, operators can better forecast improvements and control labour costs, further improving ROI over time.

Maintenance service contracts are not just a way of controlling and potentially reducing the cost of operation, they are also a safety mechanism.

For example, one case study showed a 79% reduction in lost time incidents and a 40% improvement in production using specialty services, which demonstrated payback in days from an annual specialty maintenance contract.

“Workloads may preclude staff from maintaining proper compliance or they just might not notice some violations,” the company says. “Outside resources take ownership of the plant’s efficient and productive use of the conveyor system and strive to improve conveyor efficiency, maximise equipment life and safety to add value to the operation.”

At the core of the issue is lower operating costs and improved production. The work should match or improve efficiency regarding downtime and throughput. If the criteria of compliance, cost savings and efficiency are met, then the maintenance service contract has provided a tenable ongoing solution, Martin Engineering concluded.

ROXON ups durability with new wear parts line

ROXON, a part of NEPEAN Conveyors, has released a new range of wear protection products for the mining industry.

The global mining conveyor systems and components specialist says ROXDUR uses the latest wear material technology and innovative manufacturing processes to create a truly unique range of wear products.

With operating facilities in Finland, Sweden and Australia, ROXON specialises in conveyor systems and components, and has over 50 years’ experience servicing the global mining industry.

ROXON said ROXDUR has been developed on the back of research and development from its engineering team and uses a unique composite material that combines extreme hardness to minimise abrasive wear and iron-matrix technology to absorb impact. “The metallurgical bond between the cemented carbide and iron matrix gives a composite material with very high-quality adhesion to the cemented carbide,” it said.

The ROXDUR iron-matrix technology is unprecedented in the industry and can extend the life of fixed plant mining equipment up to 20 times longer than other products, according to the company, which added it has three global patents pending for the range.

The product range includes welding segments, edge liners and wear plates and is suitable for all low- to heavy-duty mining applications, according to the company.

ROXON has developed a standard range of wear plates with a thickness of 30-50 mm but there are also opportunities to customise these depending on the application, the company said.

ROXDUR Product Manager, Oskar Larsson, said productivity losses and unplanned downtime due to wear-related breakdowns cost mining companies’ significant amounts of time and money each year.

“The use of wear resistant products is crucial to everyday operations, particularly in hard-rock mining,” he said.

“ROXDUR is a premium product that has the best durability on the market. We started developing it in 2018 and realised fairly quickly that we needed to combine the durable, but relatively brittle, cemented carbide with some toughness to get the best of both worlds in a whole new material,” he added.

“We are really excited with the new product. When compared to a standard plate of 500 Brinell, we have between 10-15 – sometimes 20 – times longer life. This will make a huge difference for our customers.”

BEUMER’s drone and 3D modelling combination speed up conveyor builds

BEUMER Group’s ability to combine high-resolution drone surveys with detailed 3D modelling is reducing the amount of time required to develop and install complex conveyor systems in the mining space, Andrea Prevedello, Global Sales Director CL Systems, told IM on the sidelines of the Bauma fair in Munich, Germany, on Tuesday.

BEUMER has been offering modelling solutions for many years, while it has been working with drones for about the past three years but combining the two for conveyor design is something new.

The first project to involve this combination is a 6.5 km conveyor installation at Knight Hawk Coal’s Prairie Eagle underground coal mine in Illinois, US.

The curved troughed belt conveyor carries coal from Knight Hawk’s new underground mine portal to its main coal preparation plant at Prairie Eagle. It allows Knight Hawk to seal a portion of its underground mine and bring coal to the surface near its current mining activities. Commissioning of the new conveying system was previously scheduled for this month.

BEUMER’s solution at the mine features a single-flight curved conveying system that eliminates the cost of tower steel, and greatly reduces the quantity of components and necessary spare parts, according to the company. It reduces the dust, noise, maintenance and operating costs associated with the transfer points, and offers 98% reliability compared with roughly 92% reliability of four conveyors operating in series, Beumer said.

In addition to this recent drone and modelling development, Prevedello said BEUMER is also now able to provide fully-erect shiploaders to customers. Instead of having to transport individual parts and erect on site, the company can now deliver a complete system that customers can slot in, he said.

For companies looking to replace an old shiploader with a new one, this is very important, Prevedello said, allowing companies to make a quick switch that minimises operational downtime.

Martin Engineering on handling uptime and potential hazards in conveyor belt operations

Martin Engineering is aware of the potential hazards and injuries that can come from a build up of material around or near conveyor belts and has issued some advice to mining companies to prevent such events occurring and to ensure bulk handling equipment works to its potential.

“As tonnes of material per hour are quickly dropped with great force through receiving chutes onto a receiving conveyor, fugitive cargo often piles up around the frame and dust migrates throughout the area, collecting on idlers, pulleys and floors and affecting air quality,” Martin Engineering said.

“Workers have to continuously clean up the material before it encapsulates the belt, potentially exposing them to a hazardous work area around a moving conveyor, where even incidental contact can result in serious injury in a split second. Considering that most conveyor injuries occur though routine maintenance or clean up, controlling fugitive material is becoming one of the primary elements in a well-organised effort to reduce hazards and prevent injuries.”

Jerad Heitzler, Product Specialist at Martin Engineering, said conveyor operators need only to take a broad look at the expense that fugitive material has on a system to realise the full cost that accompanies inefficient transfer point designs.

“Problems such as improper belt support, badly sealed chutes, damaged idlers and uneven cargo distribution can all result in spillage and belt mis-tracking,” he said. “They also contribute to increased costs for lost material, premature equipment failure, maintenance and clean-up, as well as the potential for injury and compliance issues. These factors raise the cost of operation and reduce profit margins.”

In a properly-engineered transfer point, each component, from the chute design to the cradles and dust seals, is employed to maximise its specific function and contain dust and fines, while at the same time offering workers easy access for maintenance, the company said.

Transfer points

Containment is the key to avoiding spillage and dust and there are several components designed for this purpose, according to Martin Engineering.

Although shaped transfer chutes and rock boxes direct the material flow to mitigate the concussion of material on the belt, most high-volume operations need one or more impact cradles to absorb the force of the cargo stream.

“Heavy duty impact cradles can be equipped with rubber or urethane impact bars with a top layer of slick UHMW plastic to minimise belt friction. Able to withstand impact forces as high as 17,000 lbf (53.4-75.6 kN) and drop heights of up to 50 ft (15.2 m), support beams in the centre of the cradle are set slightly below the receiving belt’s line of travel. In this way, the belt avoids sustained friction when running empty and yet can absorb hard impacts during loading, while still retaining a tight belt seal.

“Within the settling zone – located after the impact cradle in the conveyor chute box – slider cradles can then create a troughed belt to centre the cargo and reduce disruption quickly, aiding in dust settlement.”

Slider cradles, located down the length of the skirted area, have several functions, the company said. One is to create a trough angle that adequately centres the load. The trough angle also plays an important part in retaining a tight seal between the belt and the skirt. Lastly, using track mount idlers in between each cradle, a smooth belt path is created through the settling area, one that can be easily maintained.

“A smooth belt path should have no gaps, minimising disruption and promoting containment, allowing dust and fines to settle into the cargo stream prior to leaving the containment area,” the company said.

Airflow

With a constant stream of material crashing on the impact point of the receiving belt, the transfer point can be extremely turbulent, and this turbulence must be contained, Martin Engineering said.

By slowing the airflow in the skirted area, suspended dust can settle onto the cargo path. To contain the mixture of air and disrupted material, a stable, correctly-supported belt is needed for the sealing components to function properly, according to the company. Without a stable beltline, the belt will sag between idlers, and sealing components will not prevent air and fine material from escaping out of the resulting gaps, causing spillage and dust emissions.

Chute sealing

By closing gaps and keeping a tight seal on the belt, apron seals can also be attached to the chute walls to prevent fugitive dust and fines from escaping.

“A crucial requirement in any transfer point designed for reduced spillage and high efficiency is an effective skirting and wear liner sealing system at the edge of the belt,” Heitzler said. “Modern designs feature external skirting, which establish the tight belt seal needed to eliminate fugitive dust and fines.”

The external design requires minimal tools and no confined space entry to inspect, adjust or replace wear liners or skirts and, in most cases, can be performed by a single worker, Martin Engineering said. “The low profile of the skirting assembly needs only a few inches of clearance, allowing installation and maintenance in space-restricted areas. The design of these components drastically reduces scheduled downtime and the potential workplace hazards associated with replacement and adjustment.”

Dust filtration

In operations with limited space for a settling zone or especially dusty materials, dust bags and curtains may be “essential components”, the company said.

“Providing passive relief via positive air pressure created at belt conveyor loading zones, dust bags prevent the escape of airborne particulates by venting the air and collecting dust at the same time. Installed at the exit of the loading zone and mounted in the skirtboard cover, dust curtains can help create a plenum for dust suppression and dust collection.”

For additional dust control, an integrated air cleaner system can be installed at the point of emission, containing a suction blower, filtering elements and a filter cleaning system.

Conveyor uptime

The company concluded: “Managers concerned with the overall safety and cost of operation need to review potential hazards, the impact of rising labour costs for clean-up and maintenance, combined with the expense of potential fines or forced downtime, to determine specifically how they can affect the bottom line.

“Using the technologies described here, even poorly-performing conveyors often don’t need to be replaced or rebuilt, but merely modified and reconfigured by knowledgeable and experienced technicians installing modern equipment.”

Heitzler signed off: “These improvements will help operations improve efficiency, reduce risk and contribute to regulatory compliance.”

NEPEAN offers mine truck haulage alternative with relocatable conveyors

NEPEAN Conveyors’ New South Wales General Manager, Bill Munday, thinks its relocatable conveyor system will “change the game for materials handling” in 2019.

Munday said this to the Australian Mining publication during a site visit to Port Kembla.

Last year, NEPEAN Conveyors acquired Sandvik’s International Conveyor Components businesses and Sandvik’s Specialist Conveyor Systems business in Hollola, Finland.

NEPEAN’s Relocatable Conveyor system has taken over two years of research and design to develop and “promises to upend the traditional approach to conveyor design on account of its improved mobility, operational flexibility, ease of transport and speed of installation”, the company said.

Instead of building conveyor parts to meet the needs of freight shipping container dimensions, the NEPEAN Relocatable Conveyor is a half-height high cube portal frame configuration certified for standard freight shipping.

This means the conveyor is transportable anywhere in the world as a fully assembled unit, according to the company.

The frames are 12 m long, with the unit inside supporting belt widths of up to 1,800 mm on straight conveyors and 1,600 mm on curved conveyors. Roof-mounted wind guards are also available for each module in a single curve or straight two-piece configuration.

The modules can be triple stacked on a prime mover and unloaded in one bundle using standard container handling equipment, which can then place each module in line for final connection, according to the company.

This approach vastly reduces the total install cost per lineal metre by minimising both time and staff requirements during setup, NEPEAN said.

“One of the areas we really wanted to target was logistics,” Munday told Australian Mining.

“It can turn into a real logistical exercise moving all this equipment from one site to the next and doing so efficiently. The beauty of having a half-height hi cube shipping container format is that they can be multi-stacked on ships, trains or trucks,” he said.

“You can potentially get nine modules per road train at a length of 12 m per module.”

The frame’s integral legs can be set in place by removing a pin, folding them out and replacing the pin to lock the legs in position, minimising ground works.

The foot plates also have holes in for additional stakes to be inserted, which adds stability and security.

Once the modules are aligned to an installation jig on the ground – adjustable for idler spacing and roller configurations – the structure can be super elevated by up to 7° and banked around corners, according to the company.

“All the equipment is pre-designed for a fully functioning conveyor and the container module is just part of the system,” Munday said. “We have also designed a unique one-piece head end that incorporates a drive system up to approximately 4,000 kW, a loop take-up and delivery jib that can be put on a 200-t float to transport around mine sites. It is held in place by large ground anchors — there’s minimal concreting or civil works — you just dig a couple of holes and bury the ground anchor.”

In addition to significantly lowering civil works and installation costs, the NEPEAN Relocatable Conveyors mobility allows it to be adaptable to changes in mining operations and positions it as a true alternative to mine trucks when it is time to move the conveyor on site, according to the company.

Voith expands TurboBelt TPXL conveyor coupling range

Voith says it has expanded its TurboBelt TPXL range of fill-controlled couplings for conveyors, with the addition of 500 kW, 800 kW and 1,250 kW versions.

These couplings combine hydrodynamics with intelligent control technology to optimise performance, according to Voith.

The integrated controller matches the output torque exactly to the start-up parameters of the belt conveyor system, thus reducing wear and increasing service life, according to Voith. Its high power density means the TurboBelt TPXL range requires only half the volume of conventional couplings and therefore can be easily integrated into drivetrains, the company said.

Voith said: “With its proven hydrodynamic drive principle, the Voith TurboBelt TPXL range of couplings has been a staple of the mining industry for years. Delivering a nominal torque from 1,600 Nm to 7,960 Nm, respectively, the new sizes – TurboBelt 800 TPXL and TurboBelt 1250 TPXL – open up an expanded range of applications. Its rugged construction makes it ideal for use in demanding environments and tasks, such as open-pit mining.”

The TurboBelt TPXL’s plug-and-play design allows for easy integration into established systems and drivetrains and serves to significantly shorten commissioning times, according to Voith. The coupling concept consists of an integrated controller, an integrated oil pump and an oil supply unit, all of which are designed to work in tandem with each other.

“This lays the groundwork for accurate predictive maintenance to effectively keep the total cost of ownership low,” Voith said. “The TurboBelt TPXL’s hydrodynamic operating principle enables wear-free power transmission without the need for a mechanical connection. In this way, the system’s lifespan is expanded and maintenance costs are decreased significantly.”

TurboBelt DriveControl, Voith’s digital control system, was designed to work in conjunction with the TurboBelt TPXL’s integrated controller to meet even the most demanding requirements in belt conveyance, Voith said. “It allows seamless connection of drives, belt conveyors and components throughout the entire extraction process.”

In this way, TurboBelt DriveControl can handle lengths of up to 20 km as well as vertical curves and tonnages of more than 12,000 t/h, according to the company.

Votih said: “The intelligent system features autonomous belt conveyor startup and stopping procedure, even for regenerative conveyors. In addition, it extends the belt’s service life by reducing mechanical stress and dynamic impact.

“To maintain reliable conveyor performance at all times, TurboBelt DriveControl also features active load sharing, one-drive off and hot stand-by declutching function.”

The system logs all operational data, according to Voith, allowing the coupling to adjust its control behaviour in accordance with previous empirical values to accommodate a specific load situation, for example.

“Based on the required torque for the belt and the basic start-up parameters, the coupling automatically calculates the optimum fill level and fills or drains the working circuit accordingly. The stored information can be utilised for self-diagnosis and remote maintenance. In addition, the controller monitors the coupling’s entire sensor system to ensure flawless operation at all times,” Voith said.

Mining3 and Ava Group gear up for launch of Aura IQ conveyor monitoring system

Mining3 and Ava Group have revealed a little more about the plans to launch an innovative predictive asset monitoring solution for conveyors.

Under the development and commercialisation agreement signed last month, Ava’s Future Fibre Technologies (FFT) subsidiary will use its Aura advanced fibre optic sensing platform, combined with Mining3’s signal processing algorithms, to bring to market a brand new FFT solution – Aura IQ.

“This automated system will provide the global mining industry with the world’s most advanced solution in wear detection of conveyor rollers with the ability to pre-empt failure, generating significant time and cost savings,” Mining3 said.

Prof Paul Lever, CEO of Mining3, said: “Our focus remains on accelerating the research and development process to deliver breakthrough technology for our members and the global mining industry. The new development and commercialisation partnership with the Ava Group facilitates this outcome and ensures the industry benefit from much-needed advancements in technology.”

Ava Group’s Head of Extractives and Energy, Andrew Hames, said: “Mining companies are striving to realise the full benefits of evolving digital capabilities to enhance improvements in productivity; including looking at ways of using data more effectively to improve asset management, reliability and introduce predictive capability.

“This partnership is a result of our focus towards providing innovative solutions to clients in key strategic sectors. The opportunity for Ava Group and FFT is transformational for the industry and adjacent markets as we further leverage the technologies’ applications.”

Aura IQ is expected to launch in Q2 FY2019 and provide a first mover advantage for Ava Group, in a potential total addressable market of up to A$300 million ($213 million), Mining3 said.