Tag Archives: Volvo CE

Terex Trucks signs up Headwater Equipment as Alberta dealer

Terex Trucks has announced Headwater Equipment Sales Ltd as its new dealer in Alberta, Canada, bringing its articulated haulers to even more customers in the province’s construction, mining, agriculture and oil and gas sectors.

Terex Trucks articulated haulers can handle rough terrain and tough conditions and perform reliably during Canada’s coldest months of the year, according to the company.

In Alberta, a variety of tasks await Terex Trucks’ TA300 and TA400 articulated haulers. The company’s new dealer, Headwater Equipment, will sell and rent the TA300 and TA400, as well as provide aftermarket support, to its customers in the prairie province in the west of Canada.

“Customers in Alberta require tough construction equipment that performs reliably during the coldest months of the year, when temperatures can drop as low as -30 to -40°C,” the company said. “That’s one of the reasons why Terex Trucks’ durable and robust articulated haulers have a history of strong sales in the area.”

Matt Stringer, President at Headwater Equipment, said: “Terex Trucks is well known in Alberta; the haulers perform well in cold conditions. Under the ownership of Volvo CE, they’ve made substantial investments and improvements to the quality and performance of the TA400 and TA300, so we’re looking forward to introducing our customers to the upgraded trucks.”

Headquartered in Coalhurst, near Lethbridge in Alberta, Headwater Equipment operates from three locations in Alberta and one in British Columbia. The dealership was founded in 1997 and, today, 65 employees and 20 service trucks provide customers with quality equipment and support.

Greg Gerbus, Regional Sales Manager Terex Trucks, said: “Headwater Equipment is a growing dealership with a strong focus on superior customer service. Our customers will benefit from the complementary product lines Headwater Equipment provides, such as excavators, as well as their high standards and business model of creative solutions to customer needs.”

The TA300 has recently been upgraded and now comes with a new transmission, leading to improvements in fuel efficiency, performance, productivity and operator comfort, when compared with the previous model. The 28 t machine delivers a 5% improvement in fuel efficiency, a 5 km/h increase in speed to 55 km/h and an increase in the length of time between oil maintenance intervals from 1,000-4,000 hours. In addition, the truck now comes with eight forward gears as well as four reverse gears, to help ensure smoother gear shifting and, thereby, higher levels of operator comfort. All of this means that customers can be more productive, achieving faster cycle times, lower cost per tonne and reduced carbon emissions.

The TA400, the largest articulated hauler on offer from Terex Trucks, has a maximum payload of 38 t and a heaped capacity of 23.3 cu.m. Powered by a high performance, fuel efficient engine that develops a gross power of 331 kW, the TA400 is designed to meet the demands of the most extreme operations such as quarries, mines and large-scale construction projects.

The Electric Mine charges on to Sweden

Following the success of the inaugural Electric Mine event in Toronto, Canada, in April, International Mining Events has wasted no time in confirming the 2020 follow up; this time in Stockholm, Sweden.

Taking place at the Radisson Blu Waterfront Hotel on March 19-20, 2020, The Electric Mine 2020 will be even bigger, featuring new case studies from miners implementing electrification projects and presentations from the key OEMs and service suppliers shaping these solutions.

A leading hub in Europe for mining equipment and innovation, Sweden was the obvious choice for the 2020 edition of the event. Miners including Boliden and LKAB have already made electric moves above and below ground, and the north of the country is set to host Europe’s first home-grown gigafactory, the Northvolt Ett lithium-ion battery cell facility.

Sweden and Finland also play host to Europe’s major mining OEMs such as Epiroc, Sandvik, Metso and Outotec (soon to possibly be Metso Outotec Corp), and the Nordic region has a rich mining innovation legacy.

Capacity crowd

The announcement of the 2020 Electric Mine edition comes hot on the heels of a hugely successful debut in Toronto.

With the Radisson Admiral, on Toronto Harbourfront, filled out to capacity, the circa-150 attendees were treated to more than 20 world-class papers from miners Vale, Goldcorp (now Newmont Goldcorp), Kirkland Lake Gold, Boliden and Nouveau Monde Graphite; OEMs Epiroc, Sandvik, Caterpillar, Volvo CE and BELAZ; and equipment and service specialists Siemens, ABB, GE Transportation (a Wabtec company). Presentations from Doug Morrison (CEMI), Marcus Thomson (Norcat), David Sanguinetti (Global Mining Guidelines Group), Erik Isokangas (Mining3) and Ali Madiseh (University of British Columbia), meanwhile, provided the R&D angle delegates were after.

The event was a truly global affair, attracting delegates and exhibitors from Africa, Australasia, Europe, North America and South America, all eager to hear about developments across the sector.

Bigger and better

International Mining Events is upping the ante for 2020, increasing the event capacity to 200 delegates and making plans for a possible site visit to witness electric equipment in action.

Talks from several miners, as well as global international companies, will again underpin the 1.5-day conference program, which will also expand to cover the use of renewable/alternative energy within the field.

There will, again, be opportunities for sponsorship and exhibiting, with several companies already in discussions about booking the prime opportunities for the event.

If you would like to know more about The Electric Mine 2020, please feel free to contact Editorial Director, Paul Moore ([email protected]) or Editor, Dan Gleeson ([email protected]).

In the meantime, we look forward to seeing you in Stockholm!

Volvo CE staying connected to automation trend with 5G collaboration

As the application of automation in underground mines accelerates, several companies have started exploring 5G communications developments in order to handle the massive amounts of data that is being generated from autonomous equipment.

One company interested in exactly this is Volvo CE, which earlier this year, in co-operation with Telia and Ericsson, launched Sweden’s first 5G network for industrial use at its facility in Eskilstuna. The partnership could see the mining and construction equipment company become one of the first in the world to use 5G technology to test remote-controlled machines and autonomous solutions.

IM, as part of its annual focus on Nordic Suppliers (to be published in the June print issue), put some questions to Calle Skillsäter (pictured below), Volvo CE’s technical specialist for ‘Connected Machines’, to find out more about this collaboration and understand what hurdles companies are facing when trying to implement such communications solutions.

IM: What is the justification for investing in 5G technologies with Telia and Ericsson? How much of your equipment is currently controlled remotely or autonomously?

CS: Connectivity is a crucial enabler for automation, which is why this 5G project is so significant for us at Volvo CE and for the construction industry as a whole. We also believe that automation technology is at its most efficient when it is run hand in hand with electromobility – as we demonstrated through the Electric Site quarry project.

Thanks to a prior research collaboration with Telia and Ericsson, in the Pilot for Industrial Mobile Communication in Mining (PIMM) project, and now this established Telia Journey to 5G Partnership Program, we have the possibility to test future connectivity solutions for our machines in mining applications, as well as other potential applications.

Currently we are focusing on our L180H wheel loader remote-controlled prototype, but will soon test 5G on the HX2 concept (pictured above) autonomous hauler as well. There are no autonomous or tele-operated machines from Volvo CE available on the market today.

IM: Most of the 5G investment in mining has, so far, come from the Nordic region; why is this?

CS: That’s right, we do have a rather unique setup in that many Nordic companies are at the absolute forefront of their industries with this technology. Mining companies like Boliden and LKAB are driving the business to be more intelligent and automated, Ericsson & Telia bring the connectivity perspective, ABB bring their experience of automation into the process industry, and Volvo CE and Epiroc bring the machine perspective. It’s certainly the case that the Swedish engineering mindset is very open and collaborative, which is what you need to be if you are to explore the potential of new technologies and new ways of working. We are a small country and we need to collaborate and be on the edge of technology to stay competitive.

IM: Do you expect this region, in addition to Canada, to offer the most immediate potential for 5G automated and remote-controlled technologies in mining?

CS: As I’ve mentioned earlier, we have all ingredients available in the Nordics to succeed in this transformation towards more connected and automated mining solutions. Another strong reason is that we have high demands on health and safety for the people working in the mines. Automation is a key way to improve site safety and reduce the dangers and accidents associated with mining. In addition, automation is our key to staying ahead of our competitors.

IM: What testing have you so far been able to carry out at Eskilstuna? What results have been achieved?

CS: We quite recently inaugurated the new test area for automation and tele-operations, so we are still in the early phase. The initial focus is on the tele-operation of the remote-controlled wheel loader L180H, but we will very soon start testing 5G for the HX2 autonomous hauler concept machine. At the moment, it is too early to reveal any results.

IM: When do you expect to be able to test this out in a real-life underground mining environment?

CS: Tests have very recently been performed within the PIMM Digitalized Mining Arena (DMA) project in one of Boliden’s mines, using LTE wireless 4G communications, the results of which will be announced next month. Testing on a customer site with 5G is not planned yet.

IM: When comparing 5G to 4G technologies, what are the main benefits for mining companies when it comes to using this newer communication infrastructure (aside from lower latency, bandwidth, quality of service, positioning, etc)? What sort of impact could it have on operating costs considering the improved accuracy/responsiveness it brings to automated and remote-controlled operations?

CS: The main benefits are, as you say, lower latency, bandwidth and the quality of connection. But lower latency will also mean that tele-operated machines are more responsive, therefore resulting in much higher productivity. Higher bandwidth also means better video quality, which means a better work environment for the operator. Better video quality also creates a better feeling of presence, which helps to improve productivity. Quality of Service will mean machines are up and running for longer.

IM: How far is the industry away from employing these 5G solutions commercially? What are the three biggest hurdles to achieving this milestone?

CS: It’s too early to say when we think customers will be ready to see 5G solutions available commercially. But the biggest hurdles are:

  • Legislation related to the radio frequencies. There are still a number of open questions here; for example, will there be space for local industrial solutions, or will everything be dedicated to the mobile network operators?
  • Hardware availability. For example, there are not many 5G devices designed for demanding mining environments available right now on the market.
  • Business models. The new technologies will push us to review our business models. Should we continue to sell machines like we are used to?

IM: Do you expect underground mines of the future to be run solely off 5G networks? Or, do you expect a combination of 5G/Wi-Fi?

CS: There is a potential for mines to be run only on 5G in the future. But this is one of the questions that we hope to be able to answer in our coming tests and collaboration with our partners.

Volvo CE to acquire ‘construction and mining equipment adaptor’ CeDe Group

Volvo Construction Equipment is to acquire special application partner CeDe Group for an undisclosed sum, the Sweden-based company has said.

CeDe Group, based out of Malmo, Sweden, has a good reputation in the Nordic region as a low-volume adaptor of construction and mining machinery for special applications, according to Volvo CE. It has worked with several original equipment manufacturers (OEMs), including Volvo CE and its dealers, developing new bodies for haulers (eg fuel, water, waste), rail conversions for wheeled excavators, as well as conversions for underground mining applications.

The deal, which is expected to come into force by mid-March, will include CeDe’s intellectual property, operations, other assets and staff of around 45 full-time employees. As the annual volumes produced are relatively low, the deal will have no material effect on the income or financial position of Volvo CE, the company said.

Interestingly, CeDe, formed in 2000, can trace its roots back to Volvo’s original excavator business, Åkerman.

“Under Volvo CE ownership, the vision is that CeDe will remain an agile, entrepreneurial, standalone business,” Volvo CE said. “Volvo CE will make available its considerable competences to the company and add additional resources to allow it to expand its market reach and customer bases, becoming a European leader in this specialised field.”

A strengthened partner will also support Volvo CE’s objectives of expanding its product offering into new segments and applications, as well as providing a partner who can deliver low volume prototypes and production runs, Volvo CE said.The company will continue to provide and expand its engineering services to non-Volvo CE customers, it added.

Volvo CE President, Melker Jernberg, said: “This acquisition makes sense on a number of strategic levels. CeDe has already proven that it has a depth of engineering talent in adapting our machines for specialised applications. This closer relationship will allow Volvo CE to grow our product offerings while, at the same time, boosting CeDe’s ability to expand into new markets and segments, both with Volvo CE and its other OEM customers.”

CeDe Group’s Chief Executive, Krister Johnsson, said: “We are extremely pleased to be joining the Volvo CE family of companies. With our already long and good relationship with Volvo CE and deep understanding of its products, we are excited at the opportunities to develop our services and expand our reach into new markets.”

Volvo CE sets date for electrification of compact wheel loaders and excavators

Volvo Construction Equipment has announced that, by mid-2020, it will start to launch an electric range of compact wheel loaders and compact excavators.

In what the company calls “a pioneering commitment to future technology”, Volvo CE says it will stop new diesel engine-based development of its EC15- EC27 range of compact excavators and L20-L28 range of wheel loaders by this date and move forward with its new electric range.

“With this move, Volvo CE is the first construction equipment manufacturer to commit to an electric future for its compact machine range,” the company says. “This follows an overwhelmingly favourable reaction from the market after the successful unveiling of a number of concept machines in recent years, and by working closely with customers.

“This move is aligned with the Volvo Group’s strategic focus on electromobility in all business areas.”

Volvo CE, last year, carried out a trial of prototype electric machinery during the Electric Site project (pictured) at Skanska’s Vikan Kross quarry near Gothenburg, Sweden. This included the use of much larger prototype electric-hybrid wheel loaders and dual-powered, cable-connected excavators.

The first 10 weeks of the trial saw a 98% reduction in carbon emissions, a 70% reduction in energy cost and a 40% reduction in operator cost.

The first of the company’s new electric machines will be unveiled at the Bauma exhibition in April, followed by a staged market-by-market introduction and ramp up in 2020, the company said.

“While the company stresses that diesel combustion currently remains the most appropriate power source for its larger machines, electric propulsion and battery technology is proving particularly suited to Volvo’s smaller equipment,” Volvo CE said. “With research and development investment now focused on the rapid development of its electric compact wheel loaders and excavators, Volvo CE is taking a step towards diesel-free compact equipment in the future.”

Volvo CE President, Melker Jernberg, said: “Volvo CE is delivering on its commitment of ‘Building Tomorrow’ by driving leadership in electromobility and delivering sustainable solutions that support customer success. The technology we have been developing is now sufficiently robust and this, together with changes in customer behaviour and a heightened regulatory environment, means that now is the right time to commit to electromobility in our compact equipment ranges in the future.”

Volvo CE and Skanska Electric Site project cuts carbon emissions and costs

A 10-week research project electrifying and automating the majority of equipment at Skanska’s Vikan Kross quarry, near Gothenburg, Sweden, has seen a 98% reduction in carbon emissions, a 70% reduction in energy cost and a 40% reduction in operator cost.

The Electric Site research project, conducted by Volvo Construction Equipment and its customer Skanska, were even better than expected, the two companies said. As a result, the test period has been extended until the end of the year.

IM has been on site at the project today and witnessed the machines in operation.

“The results also indicate that the Electric Site project takes a big step towards helping Volvo CE achieve its future vision where work sites are 10 times more efficient, with zero accidents, zero unplanned stops and zero emissions,” Volvo CE said.

Together, these results support the potential for a 25% reduction in total cost of operations, Volvo said, explaining the reduction in total cost of operations is just a prediction at the moment.
“As the prototype machines are part of a research project and are not commercially available, it is impossible to give a guaranteed figure,” the company said.

Uwe Müller, Chief Project Manager for the Electric Site at Volvo CE, said: “Over the last 10 weeks, we’ve made incredible progress, learnt a lot and seen huge potential in the Electric Site solution’s environmental, efficiency, safety and cost benefits.

“In fact, we have decided that we want to learn more, so we will extend our test period with Skanska until the end of the year. The results we have seen so far confirm that this research project is a step towards transforming the quarry and aggregates industry and creating emission-free quarries.”

The Electric Site project aims to electrify each transport stage in a quarry – from excavation to primary crushing, and transport to secondary crushing. It incorporates electric and autonomous prototype Volvo CE machines, new work methods, and site management systems, which together form a complete site solution. New technology encompasses machine and fleet control systems and logistic solutions for electric machines in quarries.

Anders Danielsson, President and CEO of Skanska, said: “With climate change reshaping our industry, we need to find new, sustainable solutions and build partnerships with organisations that have different competencies.

“Our ambition is that this collaboration with Volvo CE will help us and our customers to reduce our carbon footprint. The power of partnership will make it happen.”

Melker Jernberg, President of Volvo CE, said: “At Volvo CE, we believe in a sustainable future and we are doing our best to build the world we want to live in. The Electric Site is one example of how we are trying to achieve this. With this research project we are combining intelligent machines, automation and electro-mobility to challenge traditional ways of working in the quarrying industry and explore new alternatives.

“We will now further mature the technologies involved and the reliability of the concept. Developing, testing and validating prototype machines with a customer at an early stage in the process speeds up development and ultimately brings more value to us and our customers.”

The Electric Site project involves eight HX2 autonomous, battery-electric load carriers, which transport the material from the primary mobile crusher up to the secondary static crusher. When it came to energy use per tonne, the HX2s proved they could help Volvo CE take a big step towards achieving its future vision where work sites are 10 times more efficient, the company said.

The second-generation prototypes incorporate shared technologies and components from the Volvo Group. They use a lithium-ion battery to power two electric motors which drive the machine; the hydraulics are driven by an additional electric motor. The HX2 is fitted with a vision system, which allows it to detect humans and obstacles in its vicinity. It can follow an adjustable, pre-programmed GPS path.

The LX1 prototype electric-hybrid wheel loader delivered more than a 50% improvement in fuel efficiency at the quarry, as well as significant reductions in emissions and noise pollution, compared with its conventional counterparts. Its job was to organise the piles of material at the site.

The LX1 is a series hybrid that incorporates a driveline that consists of electric drive motors mounted at the wheels, electric-driven hydraulics, an energy storage system, a significantly smaller diesel engine and new machine architecture, including a new design of the lifting unit. It’s this combination that enables the substantial gain in fuel efficiency.

The EX1 70 ton, dual-powered, cable-connected excavator prototype loaded the primary crusher at the quarry. The base machine for the EX1 is a Volvo EC750 crawler excavator that has been upgraded to incorporate an electric motor in addition to the diesel engine. At the quarry, the machine was plugged into the grid, so zero emissions were emitted.

If the cable is connected, the EX1 will automatically start in electric mode. If not, it will start in diesel mode. The EX1 is operated in exactly the same way as a conventional Volvo excavator.